Joe Biden is running his campaign as if he’s the Democratic front-runner.
Former vice president Joe Biden is leading the polls. And so far he has been campaigning as if his win is inevitable -- this idea that he will be the Democrats’ best chance at beating President Trump. 

But Washington Post national political reporter Matt Viser says there’s a risk: Democratic Party front-runners have historically faced challenges.

More on this topic:

Race to become British prime minister
On June 24, 2016, Britons woke up to the news that the Brexit referendum was a victory for the “Leave” campaign. Hours later, British Prime Minister David Cameron said he would step down.

Three years later, Britain finds itself in the same position.

The field of contenders to replace Theresa May, Cameron’s successor, has been narrowed down to Jeremy Hunt and Boris Johnson. One of them will lead the country and take on Brexit. 

The first of two phases has been completed in the race for the next Tory leader. And The Post’s London correspondent Karla Adam says the stakes could not be higher.

More on this topic:

Love letters from a gay first lady
Rose Cleveland was America’s first lady until her brother, President Grover Cleveland, married in 1886. 

A historian recently came across love letters she sent, after her time in the White House, to Evangeline Simpson Whipple. 

More on this topic:

Get unlimited access to The Washington Post’s website and apps for less than $1 a week. Go to PostReports.com/offer to access a special offer for podcast listeners.
Add to a podcast app
Joe Biden is running his campaign as if he’s the Democratic front-runner.
Former vice president Joe Biden is leading the polls. And so far he has been campaigning as if his win is inevitable -- this idea that he will be the Democrats’ best chance at beating President Trump. 

But Washington Post national political reporter Matt Viser says there’s a risk: Democratic Party front-runners have historically faced challenges.

More on this topic:

Race to become British prime minister
On June 24, 2016, Britons woke up to the news that the Brexit referendum was a victory for the “Leave” campaign. Hours later, British Prime Minister David Cameron said he would step down.

Three years later, Britain finds itself in the same position.

The field of contenders to replace Theresa May, Cameron’s successor, has been narrowed down to Jeremy Hunt and Boris Johnson. One of them will lead the country and take on Brexit. 

The first of two phases has been completed in the race for the next Tory leader. And The Post’s London correspondent Karla Adam says the stakes could not be higher.

More on this topic:

Love letters from a gay first lady
Rose Cleveland was America’s first lady until her brother, President Grover Cleveland, married in 1886. 

A historian recently came across love letters she sent, after her time in the White House, to Evangeline Simpson Whipple. 

More on this topic:

Get unlimited access to The Washington Post’s website and apps for less than $1 a week. Go to PostReports.com/offer to access a special offer for podcast listeners.
Previous Episode
Chris Davenport on The Washington Post’s project for the 50th anniversary of the Apollo moon landing: 50 astronauts on what it’s like to be in space. And art critic Sebastian Smee on Frida Kahlo, after the release of a recording thought to be her voice.
Friday, June 21, 2019
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Sarah Ellison untangles Judge Jeanine Pirro’s Trump-like political evolution. Rhonda Colvin delves into three lawmakers’ personal encounters with gun violence. And Jacob Bogage explains how Michigan’s baseball team recruited racial diversity — and won.
Tuesday, June 25, 2019