Post Reports

Keeping the music on: How go-go became the center of D.C.’s gentrification battle

Marissa Lang on how a D.C. store’s booming go-go beats became a focus of Washington’s gentrification dilemma. And Sally Jenkins explains what she believes is the first truly woman-powered franchise in sports history.
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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.

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‘It’s more than go-go’ 
The nation’s capital is a rapidly gentrifying city struggling to maintain its identity and culture as apartment buildings and housing prices climb. 

But when a Metro PCS store was forced to temporarily stop playing go-go music outside of its brick and mortar store, Post local reporter Marissa Lang explains, it became ground zero for the gentrification battle. 

“Go-go was born in the District in the 1970s and became known as the pulse of ‘Chocolate City,’ ” Lang says. “But over the past several years, the genre has struggled as the city has changed.” 

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Women’s World Cup 
The U.S. women’s national soccer team competes against the Netherlands in the World Cup championship this Sunday. 

Post columnist Sally Jenkins says it’s time to stop contextualizing this year’s team in relation to the men.
“All they’ve done,” Jenkins says, “is basically build a worldwide sport in less than two decades. The NFL needed 100 years to get into the public consciousness this way, the NBA 75. How about, just once, we marvel at what this women’s program has accomplished without all the ‘yeah buts.’ ”

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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.