What’s missing from our gun-violence conversations
Conversations around gun violence in America tend to sidestep one element that nearly every mass shooting since 1966 has in common: the role of masculinity in grooming the shooter. 

Video producer Nicki DeMarco and her colleague Erin Patrick O’Connor have been studying the connection between guns and definitions of manhood to try to figure out why men overwhelmingly commit these acts. Researcher Scott Melzer told them, “When we expect boys and men to be dominant, powerful, in charge, to not give in – we’re coaching them, training them to commit violence when they feel like they’ve lost control.”

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Elvis has reentered the building
When Elvis Presley took the stage at International Hotel in Las Vegas in July 1969, it was his first time performing in nine years. 

His 57-show run at the International would punctuate a comeback that would become the last stage of his career, launched after a decade of poorly received movie appearances. 

“Cosmically, we always associate him with Vegas,” reporter Geoff Edgers says. “The jumpsuits. The handkerchiefs. There’s something about that whole slick, glittery, Vegas look – that Cadillac rolling down the Strip – that we now associate with Elvis.”

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What’s missing from our gun-violence conversations
Conversations around gun violence in America tend to sidestep one element that nearly every mass shooting since 1966 has in common: the role of masculinity in grooming the shooter. 

Video producer Nicki DeMarco and her colleague Erin Patrick O’Connor have been studying the connection between guns and definitions of manhood to try to figure out why men overwhelmingly commit these acts. Researcher Scott Melzer told them, “When we expect boys and men to be dominant, powerful, in charge, to not give in – we’re coaching them, training them to commit violence when they feel like they’ve lost control.”

More on this topic:


Elvis has reentered the building
When Elvis Presley took the stage at International Hotel in Las Vegas in July 1969, it was his first time performing in nine years. 

His 57-show run at the International would punctuate a comeback that would become the last stage of his career, launched after a decade of poorly received movie appearances. 

“Cosmically, we always associate him with Vegas,” reporter Geoff Edgers says. “The jumpsuits. The handkerchiefs. There’s something about that whole slick, glittery, Vegas look – that Cadillac rolling down the Strip – that we now associate with Elvis.”

More on this topic:
Previous Episode
Greg Miller unpacks the calls for a redirection of U.S. counterterrorism efforts. Frances Stead Sellers and Whitney Leaming on people’s search for home after the Camp Fire. And Monica Hesse pokes holes in the gender-reveal party trend.
Thursday, August 8, 2019
Next Episode
Sen. Cory Booker lays out his gun policy proposal. Matt Zapotosky on what convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein’s apparent suicide in federal custody can tell us about the case moving forward. And Alex Horton gives us a reality check on a meme.
Monday, August 12, 2019