Post Reports

‘People were always so welcoming, so kind, so helpful.’ And then the president arrived.

From a community divided by xenophobic chants, Griff Witte explains what the president’s rhetoric can do on the ground. Jeff Stein on the aging problem in the U.S. And Andrew Freedman on the record-breaking number of fires in the Amazon.
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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.

In this episode

A community wrestles with the fallout of a Trump rally
Last month, President Trump visited Greenville, N.C., where rally attendees broke out in a chant of “Send her back!” directed at a Muslim lawmaker. That chant continues to reverberate more than a month later for immigrants, refugees and other residents of the community who see themselves as targets for xenophobia and hate.

Reporter Griff Witte finds many residents of Greenville now worried that the president’s words will be used as a pretext for violence in their neighborhood. 

“We all see these rallies, and we see the highlights from them,” Witte says. “But we have to remember that there are communities involved.”

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‘We as a nation really have not valued taking care of these people’
Across Maine, families are being hammered by two demographic forces — the growth of the retired population and a simultaneous decline in young workers — that have been exacerbated by a national worker shortage pushing up the cost of labor.

As more states face these pressures, the country will have to figure out how to refashion its workforce, overhaul old-age programs and care for tens of millions of elderly people with insufficient savings and insurance, says reporter Jeff Stein.

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The cradle of biodiversity burns
Huge patches of the Amazon are burning at one of the fastest rates in years. The fires — most of which were set by farmers clearing land during the early dry season — are so large that smoke has traveled thousands of miles to cover the country’s most populous city, Sao Paulo. 

Critics blame far-right president Jair Bolsonaro, whose administration cut back efforts to control illegal deforestation when he took office in October. In turn, he has accused scientific organizations and the country’s media of releasing false statistics. 

For many, the controversy over the government’s land-use policies is overshadowed by concerns over what the fires mean for climate change, says environmental reporter Andrew Freedman

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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.