When did the GOP cool toward climate change?
You’re not imagining it: Natural disasters like hurricanes and wildfires are becoming bigger, more intense, deadlier. A U.S. government report last month points to climate change and its effects, and says that the danger of such catastrophes is worsening. The effects of climate change, the report says, pose a severe threat to Americans’ health and pocketbooks, as well as the country’s infrastructure and natural resources.

Whether Earth’s temperature is rising is not in dispute among most scientists and other world leaders. President Trump dismissed the 1,600-page report pointblank, telling reporters “I don’t believe it.” Other members of the Republican Party have called the report “alarmist.”

But climate change has not always a partisan issue in the United States. Post political reporter Matt Viser explains how climate skepticism entered the GOP mainstream.

More on this topic:

An Affair. The Mob. A Murder.
In 1986, a woman’s body was found in the trunk of her car. She had been shot in the head and wrapped in an afghan blanket from her couch. Washington Post reporter Mary Jordan was in her mid-20s at the time and covered the grisly murder.

Decades later, the victim’s family reached out to Jordan. The case had never been solved, and while investigators moved on, the family had not.

Jordan had become a veteran Post reporter, covering national politics and spending years overseas as a correspondent in Mexico, England and Japan.

So when her office phone rang on a September morning in autumn 2015, it seemed sheer luck that she was in Washington at the time, let alone at her desk. The family of the slain woman had new information they wanted to share. “It was fairly irresistible,” Jordan says. “And I also did think that, wow, the chances that I'm still at the paper all these years later and sitting at my desk when the phone rings. It's kind of meant to be.”

This is part one of a two-part series.

More on this topic:

The memoir George H.W. Bush never wrote
Memoirs have become a standard expectation of post-presidential life: Bill Clinton had “My Life,” George W. Bush had “Decision Points,” and Barack Obama’s still-untitled book is due out next year. The trend is relatively new.

But George H.W. Bush never wrote a memoir before his passing. “It’s our loss,” Post book critic Carlos Lozada says. The former president was simply, as he himself said, “unpersuaded.”

More on this topic:

Add to a podcast app
When did the GOP cool toward climate change?
You’re not imagining it: Natural disasters like hurricanes and wildfires are becoming bigger, more intense, deadlier. A U.S. government report last month points to climate change and its effects, and says that the danger of such catastrophes is worsening. The effects of climate change, the report says, pose a severe threat to Americans’ health and pocketbooks, as well as the country’s infrastructure and natural resources.

Whether Earth’s temperature is rising is not in dispute among most scientists and other world leaders. President Trump dismissed the 1,600-page report pointblank, telling reporters “I don’t believe it.” Other members of the Republican Party have called the report “alarmist.”

But climate change has not always a partisan issue in the United States. Post political reporter Matt Viser explains how climate skepticism entered the GOP mainstream.

More on this topic:

An Affair. The Mob. A Murder.
In 1986, a woman’s body was found in the trunk of her car. She had been shot in the head and wrapped in an afghan blanket from her couch. Washington Post reporter Mary Jordan was in her mid-20s at the time and covered the grisly murder.

Decades later, the victim’s family reached out to Jordan. The case had never been solved, and while investigators moved on, the family had not.

Jordan had become a veteran Post reporter, covering national politics and spending years overseas as a correspondent in Mexico, England and Japan.

So when her office phone rang on a September morning in autumn 2015, it seemed sheer luck that she was in Washington at the time, let alone at her desk. The family of the slain woman had new information they wanted to share. “It was fairly irresistible,” Jordan says. “And I also did think that, wow, the chances that I'm still at the paper all these years later and sitting at my desk when the phone rings. It's kind of meant to be.”

This is part one of a two-part series.

More on this topic:

The memoir George H.W. Bush never wrote
Memoirs have become a standard expectation of post-presidential life: Bill Clinton had “My Life,” George W. Bush had “Decision Points,” and Barack Obama’s still-untitled book is due out next year. The trend is relatively new.

But George H.W. Bush never wrote a memoir before his passing. “It’s our loss,” Post book critic Carlos Lozada says. The former president was simply, as he himself said, “unpersuaded.”

More on this topic:

Previous Episode
Here it is: the new daily podcast from the newsroom of The Washington Post. “Post Reports,” hosted by Martine Powers, will bring you all the reporting and insight you expect from The Post, but for your ears. Launching Dec. 3. Sign up now. Sound. Informed.
Wednesday, November 28, 2018
Next Episode
The Democratic National Committee struggles to find a big-enough stage for likely presidential candidates. Plus, the second and final installment of our series “An Affair. The Mob. A Murder.”
Tuesday, December 4, 2018