Post Reports

Protests, defections, rebellions — a chaotic week for British politics

Kevin Sullivan breaks down Boris Johnson’s Brexit battle. Caroline Kitchener describes the state of women’s health care in Maine. And Danielle Paquette takes us on a ride with an African delivery service.
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Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.

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Boris Johnson is steering toward a no-deal Brexit. Parliament is trying to stop him.
Prime Minister Boris Johnson has faced several defeats this week. After losing a governing majority in Parliament, he saw his own brother resign from Parliament and watched a bill that would bar a no-deal Brexit without lawmakers’ approval to find support in the House of Commons.

Johnson is now pressing for an early general election for all 650 seats in the House of Commons, with the hope of delivering Brexit by Oct. 31. 

“The whole thing is a bit of a muddle,” says London correspondent Kevin Sullivan. “Everyone is looking for some clarity.” 

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‘You want to have some kind of control’
Planned Parenthood ended its participation in a federal family planning program last month. The organization’s announcement came after a prolonged legal battle with the Trump administration, which introduced prohibitions on abortion referrals into the program. 

Last week, Maine Family Planning — an independent network of 18 reproductive health clinics providing birth control, primary care, STD screenings and abortion to women across mostly rural parts of the state — followed suit in withdrawing from Title X. 

“What Planned Parenthood has that a lot of these smaller, independent clinics don’t have is this massive war chest of funding,” says The Lily reporter Caroline Kitchener. “It’s just so much more visible, even to people in a state where 18 of the 20 clinics are not Planned Parenthood.”

Clinics in rural areas are the most likely to close if their funding dries up. But the practitioners Kitchener spoke with say that those are the most essential to keep open. 

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The growing e-commerce sector in Africa
By some estimates, the number of Internet users in Africa is greater than the population of the United States. But reaching that exploding market is a major challenge on the continent, where business leaders are working on leaping into the complicated world of same-day delivery.

West Africa bureau chief Danielle Paquette road with a delivery person who works for Africa’s biggest web retailer, Jumia. Along her route, she navigated a lack of street signs, dominance of cash, threat of robbery and fear of knockoffs to get packages out as quickly as possible. 

“She wants to create a career in the world of online shopping,” Paquette says of the deliverywoman. “She told me she thinks it’s the future.”

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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.