Post Reports

Senate shutdown votes are ‘fundamentally designed not to pass’

Seung Min Kim on stalled legislative efforts to end the seemingly never-ending shutdown. Moriah Balingit on the state of public school systems in light of the Los Angeles teachers’ strike. Plus, how international trade wars hit small-town America.
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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.

In this episode

A game of legislative chicken
As the government shutdown ends its fifth week, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has set up votes on two competing bills in the Senate tomorrow. One is his own plan, which trades border wall funding for protections under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy. The other, backed by House Democrats, does not provide border wall funding but reopens the government for negotiations.

The Washington Post’s Seung Min Kim breaks down both proposals and says neither is likely to pass.

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Los Angeles teachers return to classrooms
Los Angeles public school teachers reached a deal with school officials Tuesday to end the weeklong strike that affected more than 600,000 students and raised questions about staffing and the future of the nation’s second-largest school system.

The teachers in the LA Unified School District had walked out of their classrooms to protest the lack of resources for their students and classrooms. Moriah Balingit covers education for The Post. She says what the LA teachers did is a symbol of what public school teachers across the nation are facing.

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Whiskey, soured
When President Trump imposed new tariffs on European aluminum and steel, he unleashed a trade war with the European Union. One unexpected victim: American whiskey.

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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.