The Biden-Putin summit
President Biden meets with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Geneva, along with U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov. (Peter Klaunzer/Swiss Federal Office of Foreign Affairs/Bloomberg News)
President Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin lauded their Wednesday summit as “positive” and “constructive” — but politics reporter Eugene Scott says their back-to-back news conferences made clear that the two leaders remain at odds. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s eviction moratorium is up at the end of June, leaving many renters at risk of eviction. Kyle Swenson reports on why rent relief hasn’t made it to many who need it and how some tenants are getting by

If you’re enjoying this podcast and you’d like to support the reporting that makes it possible, please consider subscribing to The Washington Post. A subscription gets you unlimited access to all the journalism we publish, from breaking news to deep investigations to baking tips. Subscriptions also directly support this show, and the work of Washington Post journalists around the world. 

Right now, podcast listeners can get one year of unlimited access to The Post for just $29. That’s less than one dollar a week. 

Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://wapo.st/3zkogmc
Add to a podcast app
The Biden-Putin summit
President Biden meets with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Geneva, along with U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov. (Peter Klaunzer/Swiss Federal Office of Foreign Affairs/Bloomberg News)
President Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin lauded their Wednesday summit as “positive” and “constructive” — but politics reporter Eugene Scott says their back-to-back news conferences made clear that the two leaders remain at odds. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s eviction moratorium is up at the end of June, leaving many renters at risk of eviction. Kyle Swenson reports on why rent relief hasn’t made it to many who need it and how some tenants are getting by

If you’re enjoying this podcast and you’d like to support the reporting that makes it possible, please consider subscribing to The Washington Post. A subscription gets you unlimited access to all the journalism we publish, from breaking news to deep investigations to baking tips. Subscriptions also directly support this show, and the work of Washington Post journalists around the world. 

Right now, podcast listeners can get one year of unlimited access to The Post for just $29. That’s less than one dollar a week. 

Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://wapo.st/3zkogmc
Previous Episode
Some businesses ask whether higher wages could be the answer to the labor shortage. Members of Congress return to the Capitol, and all its security concerns. And a new era of space travel dawns — for those who can afford it.
Tuesday, June 15, 2021
Next Episode
The Fed says inflation could climb higher than projected — but many of the price hikes could be short-lived. How to navigate the many new spending opportunities the end of the pandemic has brought. Plus, the power of this year’s graduation speeches.
Thursday, June 17, 2021