Winners and losers from the third Democratic debate
Democratic presidential candidates met in Houston on Thursday night for their third debate of 2019, this time all on one night. 

Based on their performance, politics reporter Aaron Blake says, “this was a step in the right direction” for Democrats worried about how their favorite candidates might shape up in debates against President Trump. “We didn’t really see any candidates have really awful moments like we have seen in some of these debates.”

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A ‘fascinating and complex and heartbreaking place’
This week marked President Trump’s first visit to Baltimore since he described the city as “hell” and a “disgusting, rat and rodent infested mess” where “no human being would want to live.”

His critique was not well received in the city that is still healing from the 2015 death of 25-year-old Freddie Gray while in police custody. Since then, the city has been forced to reckon with its racial and economic inequities under the national spotlight. 

Tens of millions of dollars poured into the city after Gray’s death, says Maryland politics reporter Erin Cox: “There was this rush of people at every level of government and community deciding they were going to help finally address the systemic issues of poverty and racism.”

But four years later, vague promises and fading media attention has left the city back where it started. 

“When you make an impossible promise, they tend to be impossible to keep,” Cox says. 

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Winners and losers from the third Democratic debate
Democratic presidential candidates met in Houston on Thursday night for their third debate of 2019, this time all on one night. 

Based on their performance, politics reporter Aaron Blake says, “this was a step in the right direction” for Democrats worried about how their favorite candidates might shape up in debates against President Trump. “We didn’t really see any candidates have really awful moments like we have seen in some of these debates.”

More on this topic:

A ‘fascinating and complex and heartbreaking place’
This week marked President Trump’s first visit to Baltimore since he described the city as “hell” and a “disgusting, rat and rodent infested mess” where “no human being would want to live.”

His critique was not well received in the city that is still healing from the 2015 death of 25-year-old Freddie Gray while in police custody. Since then, the city has been forced to reckon with its racial and economic inequities under the national spotlight. 

Tens of millions of dollars poured into the city after Gray’s death, says Maryland politics reporter Erin Cox: “There was this rush of people at every level of government and community deciding they were going to help finally address the systemic issues of poverty and racism.”

But four years later, vague promises and fading media attention has left the city back where it started. 

“When you make an impossible promise, they tend to be impossible to keep,” Cox says. 

More on this topic:
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Laura Meckler examines what school segregation looks like today. Heather Long on the minority women changing the makeup of the U.S. workforce. And Nick Miroff explains the Supreme Court’s move on a Trump administration asylum policy.
Thursday, September 12, 2019
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Joel Achenbach reports on chronic pain and opioids. Sarah Kaplan on how American teens are channeling their anxiety over climate change into activism. And Max Bearak visits a Kenyan community whose members say its source of power was stolen.
Monday, September 16, 2019