Post Reports

The free-for-all over Medicare-for-all

Jeff Stein describes how Medicare-for-all would work. Rachel Siegel explains what President Trump’s trade war is doing to lobster fishing towns in Maine. And Michelle Ye Hee Lee on single-dollar donors.
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Post Reports is the premier daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Every weekday afternoon.

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How Medicare-for-all would work depends on whom you ask
Earlier this month, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) released a plan to overhaul the nation’s health-care system by shifting tens of trillions of dollars to fund a universal benefits package.

The presidential candidate’s proposal adopts many of the facets of Sen. Bernie Sanders’s (I-Vt.) vision for the country’s health care, placing all Americans on a single government insurer and eradicating more than 150 million private health insurance plans. And it’s not without controversy in the party. 

“The other two leading candidates in the race – former vice president Joe Biden and Pete Buttigieg – have been more skeptical about Medicare-for-all and have seen it as a way for them to demonstrate that they’re the moderates and centrists in the race,” economic policy reporter Jeff Stein says. 

“They’re saying, ‘We can still get to universal coverage, we can make sure that everyone is insured but not at the expense of forcing everyone in America to be on the single-payer plan and not guaranteeing benefits to everyone in the country.’ “

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Maine lobster sales fall to the trade war
The U.S.-China trade war has upended supply chains around the world. One place where change has been especially stark is in the North Atlantic, where relations between traditionally close fishing communities in Maine and a small province of Canada were splintered by tariffs last year. 

“While things are way down in Maine, business is booming up in Canada,” says business reporter Rachel Siegel, who traveled to Tignish, Prince Edward Island, in Canada to interview fishers whose way of life has been disrupted by the trade war. 

“There’s so much shared history between the Canadian lobster industry and the Maine lobster industry, starting with the fishermen and all the way up the supply chain,” Siegel says. “But what this trade war has done is send neighbors that have pretty much always run in tandem in totally different directions.”

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What a dollar can buy in the presidential primaries 
Here in the real world, a dollar can barely get you a pack of gum or a cup of coffee. But in the world of campaign fundraising, a small donation like that is important for candidates trying to show the scope of their support. 

“Each of the candidates want to show that there is momentum for this campaign, that there is enthusiasm and a donor base that’s really eager to give them money,” political reporter Michelle Ye Hee Lee says. “A way they try to show that is by saying, ‘We have X many donors from X many states who are giving us money for our campaigns.’ ”

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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the premier daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Every weekday afternoon.