Post Reports

The future of a drug company blamed for helping fuel the opioid crisis

Chris Rowland explains why one of the companies accused of fueling the opioid epidemic is declaring bankruptcy. Griff Witte looks at why Republican legislators feel they can’t stray from Trump. And Ellen Nakashima discusses Saudi Arabia’s Twitter spies.
Listen for free

About Post Reports

Post Reports is the premier daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Every weekday afternoon.

In this episode

The future of Purdue Pharma 
The drug manufacturer accused of helping fuel the nation’s opioid epidemic through its sale of the profitable painkiller OxyContin filed for bankruptcy two months ago.

But the family behind the company is also planning to turn Purdue Pharma into a public trust.

That new company would create anti-addiction drugs as well as overdose rescue drugs that could be distributed for free throughout the country, says business reporter Chris Rowland.

“Some people say this is an effort by the [Sackler] family and Purdue Pharma to improve the narrative of their legacy,” Rowland reports. The Sacklers say they are committed to anti-addiction efforts. 

More on this topic:

Why Republican legislators feel bound to President Trump
Last month, Rep. Francis Rooney (R-Fla.) told reporters that he had not ruled out the possibility of voting to impeach President Trump. A day later, the two-term congressman from a heavily Republican district announced his retirement.

“Throughout Trump’s presidency, there has been a question a lot of Democrats, a lot of liberals, ask about why it is that Republican lawmakers don’t just en masse say no to Trump,” reporter Griff Witte says. “I thought that this Francis Rooney episode was a microcosm, a pretty tidy explanation for why it is that that doesn’t happen.”

More on this topic:

Former Twitter employees accused of spying for Saudi Arabia
The Justice Department has charged two former Twitter employees with spying for Saudi Arabia, marking the first time federal prosecutors have publicly accused the kingdom of running agents in the United States.

“These former employees were alleged to have accessed the sensitive personal information of a number of Twitter users,” national security reporter Ellen Nakashima says. “Some were prominent dissidents who were critics of the Saudi government or the Saudi royal family, and were thus people who the Saudi government would want to track, monitor, unmask and — perhaps — silence.”

More on this topic:

About Post Reports

Post Reports is the premier daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Every weekday afternoon.