Post Reports

The human cost of food delivery in China

Mike DeBonis unpacks the White House’s strategy as the impeachment inquiry unfolds. Gerry Shih describes the human toll of the food delivery industry in China. And Valerie Strauss on the lengths to which teachers will go to get classroom supplies.
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Post Reports is the premier daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Every weekday afternoon.

In this episode

Why the White House won’t participate in this week’s impeachment proceedings 
President Trump and his attorneys have declined to participate in the House Judiciary Committee’s first impeachment hearing Wednesday — one that they argue “does not begin to provide the President with any semblance of a fair process.” 

Congressional reporter Mike DeBonis says the administration’s response suggests that it will continue with its strategy of noncooperation and bet on support from Republicans in casting the inquiry as a partisan witch hunt. 

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In China, the gig economy taken to a chaotic extreme
Chinese consumers are becoming increasingly reliant on food delivery. The country’s $36 billion market is three times the size of the U.S. food delivery market, a high-tech system made possible by low-cost labor. 

“This is an absolutely embedded aspect of life as a middle-class person living in China,” correspondent Gerry Shih says. But it’s also had significant implications for the people who make those deliveries. 

Shih heard from drivers from throughout the country who shared stories about managing their crushing workloads, bad weather, unruly traffic and unforgiving dispatch algorithms.

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‘As a teacher, I am a total scavenger’
Federal data shows that most educators spend an average of $500 per year on school supplies. But a new review by The Post reveals that the problem is actually deeper than previously known, with some teachers going to great lengths to secure resources for their classrooms.

“They find very unique ways, often time-consuming, sometimes soul-crushing,” education reporter Valerie Strauss says. Last month, she heard from more than 1,200 teachers who emailed The Post about their experiences. 

“One teacher told me she’s found supplies literally thrown on the side of the road and discovered she could use them because they weren’t ruined.”

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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the premier daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Every weekday afternoon.