Post Reports

The immigration policies causing further uncertainty for asylum seekers

Nick Miroff and Kevin Sieff on the policies causing further uncertainty for asylum seekers. Plus, Amy Goldstein explains another threat to the ACA. And Rick Maese on the 10-year-old hoping to skateboard into the Olympics.
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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the premier daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Every weekday afternoon.

In this episode

How changing immigration policies have caused more uncertainty for asylum seekers 
Nationwide immigration raids failed to materialize this weekend after President Trump vowed to round up families who entered the country recently and face deportation orders. Immigration reporter Nick Miroff gives background on a new round of changes to asylum policies introduced Monday.

Latin America correspondent Kevin Sieff says that changing immigration policies have already started playing out across the border. He reports from Nuevo Laredo, which he says is a “remarkably dangerous” city that’s part of the administration’s “Remain in Mexico” program. 

“The idea that the U.S. would be forcing asylum seekers to wait there is really controversial and really worrying for a lot of human rights officials and a lot of Mexican officials who wonder how asylum seekers will stay safe there,” Sieff explains.

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The latest legal battle over the Affordable Care Act
“The Affordable Care Act is a law that's been under one kind of threat or another almost since it was passed by a Democratic Congress in 2010,” says health-care policy writer Amy Goldstein. She’s been reporting on the latest challenge to the law, currently playing out in a federal appellate court in New Orleans. 

Goldstein explains that, although Republican attorneys general are arguing against the ACA’s constitutionality, Republicans might be the ones to suffer in 2020 if millions of Americans lose their health coverage. 

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2020’s youngest Olympian? 
10-year-old Sky Brown has fractured a bone kick-flipping off stairs. She’s taken plenty of tumbles off her backyard skate ramp. 

But as sports feature writer Rick Maese explains, the skateboard-sized athlete has the kind of outsized talent that might get her to next summer’s Olympics in Tokyo, attracting a younger audience to the program that’s added sports like skateboarding and rock climbing to its roster. 

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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the premier daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Every weekday afternoon.