The racial reckoning of Pete Buttigieg

William Booth on what Boris Johnson’s sweeping majority means for Brexit. Robert Samuels on Pete Buttigieg’s often clumsy attempts to understand the black experience. And the downside of a new cutting-edge wireless network.
Listen for free

About Post Reports

Post Reports is the premier daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Every weekday afternoon.

In this episode

Boris Johnson comes out of the U.K. election with a mandate: Get Brexit done. Now what?
Prime Minister Boris Johnson won a sweeping majority of parliamentary seats — and a mandate to deliver Brexit — in Thursday's general election.

“Johnson won King Kong big,” says London bureau chief William Booth

Johnson wants to hold a vote on his Brexit withdrawal agreement before Christmas. If it passes and is ratified by the European Parliament, Britain will leave the European Union at the end of January, entering a nearly year-long transition period.

But as Booth explains, what happens on Feb. 1 is far from settled.

More on this topic:

Inside Pete Buttigieg’s struggle to understand the black experience 
Mayor Pete Buttigieg’s campaign for president has featured a series of fumbles on race. 

His campaign angered some African American leaders in South Carolina after at least one was wrongly listed as endorsing Buttigieg’s agenda for the black community. Making matters worse, his campaign issued a photo promoting that agenda featuring a black mother and child who live in Kenya, not the United States.

“I wanted to know who his black friends were,” national political reporter Robert Samuels said. “Because I had this idea that, for people who have interracial friendships, really deep ones, there is always a moment where they have this conversation and they have this realization that, ‘Oh, my lived experience is quite different from yours.’ ”

More on this topic:

The downside of 5G
5G is a cutting-edge wireless network that makes phones faster and helps other technology work better. There’s a push to expand 5G in the United States, but scientists warn that the expansion of the network could interfere with weather sensors and introduce bad data to meteorology.

“The most likely case is that weather forecasts, on a routine basis, become less reliable for a time and that the experts at the National Weather Service and NASA and other agencies figure out ways to get around it,” says weather reporter Andrew Freedman. “But the worst-case scenario really is viable, and that is that, at a time when extreme weather events are happening more frequently and severely due to climate change and other factors, we could have less warning of them.” 

More on this topic:

About Post Reports

Post Reports is the premier daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Every weekday afternoon.