Post Reports

The story of Hunter Biden’s dealings in Ukraine

Michael Kranish looks into Hunter Biden’s dealings in Ukraine. Julie Zauzmer rides along with two pastors working to revive shrinking churches. Plus, Jemar Tisby on the burden of forgiveness for black Americans.
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Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.

In this episode

Hunter Biden’s relationship with Ukraine
In the backdrop of an extraordinary whistleblower complaint against President Trump is Joe Biden’s son Hunter Biden and his decision to get involved with an obscure Ukrainian gas company half a decade ago. 

Hunter Biden joined the board of a Ukrainian gas company but won’t say what he did and how much he received for the job. Now, the Trump administration is under impeachment review after asking the Ukrainian president to help bring up dirt on Joe Biden and his son.

“There's just a number of factors and incidents where Hunter Biden is doing business when his father's interests might also be raised,” says political investigative reporter Michael Kranish

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Reviving the circuit preacher
Mainline denominations — Protestant institutions like Methodist, Presbyterian and Lutheran churches — are on a precipitous decline. 

Churches in rural areas are facing the tough question of how to keep serving the members who are left. Some have simply closed down. Others have merged. And in an increasing number of places, rural and urban, pastors are bringing back an old-fashioned concept: the circuit preacher.

ReporterJulie Zauzmer rode along with two pastors as they made their rounds through five churches one Sunday, a weekly acrobatics of military-precision timing and long-distance driving that are what it takes to make Sunday church services happen in a place where churchgoers are aging, pews are getting emptier and budgets are getting smaller. 

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The burden of forgiveness
The white former police officer Amber Guyger who shot and killed her unarmed black neighbor, Botham Jean, in his own apartment, was sentenced Wednesday to 10 years in prison — a sentence just as polarizing as the scene that took place in the courtroom after. 

Brandt Jean embraced his brother’s killer for nearly a minute in the middle of the courtroom, telling her: “I forgive you.”

Then came another unlikely embrace — from the judge in the case. 
Many saw inspiring forgiveness in that moment, but historian and author Jemar Tisby saw something else, too.

“With a very public act of forgiveness like Brandt Jean displayed is that some people, particularly white people would use that as a cover to ignore the very real consequences of police brutality and anti-black racism,” he says. 

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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.