Post Reports

The Texas teenagers who allegedly smuggled immigrants across the southern border

Karoun Demirjian on what we’ve learned from the impeachment inquiry transcripts released this week. Maria Sacchetti on the role U.S. citizens play in immigration smuggling. And Rebecca Tan explains part of the new generation’s enthusiasm for cricket.
Listen for free

About Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.

In this episode

Released transcripts open a new phase of the impeachment inquiry
House investigators have released the first transcripts from closed-door depositions taken as part of the impeachment inquiry, as several White House officials — including John Eisenberg, a lawyer central to the Ukraine controversy — defy subpoenas to testify.

“We’re starting to see some of the dynamics behind what happened behind closed doors,” congressional reporter Karoun Demirjian says. “And it’s giving us a view into both what the Democrats’ strategy is for building this case, but also what the Republican strategy is for tearing it down.”

Most immediately, the transcripts show the active hand Republicans have had during interviews with Marie Yovanovitch, former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, and Michael McKinley, a former senior adviser to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.

In his deposition documents, Gordon Sondland, the ambassador to the European Union, revised an earlier testimony, acknowledging that he told one of Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky’s advisers that “resumption of U.S. aid would likely not occur until Ukraine provided the public anti-corruption statement” they had discussed prior.

More on this topic:

Why more U.S. citizens are being convicted of smuggling immigrants across the border 
More than 4,100 people were charged with smuggling during the first nine months of fiscal 2019, the highest number since the federal court system began tracking such prosecutions in 2001.

The U.S. government has assailed these smugglers as the henchmen of international cartels and gangs, but more than 60 percent of those convicted of smuggling in recent years have been U.S. citizens — the majority of them with little or no criminal history, according to the U.S. Sentencing Commission.

“They’re a very important part of this, because the ride from the border deeper into the United States is the last and crucial leg,” immigration reporter Maria Sacchetti says. “So Americans are very, very important to this process now, by design.”

More on this topic:

First-generation Americans embrace cricket
For three hours every Wednesday, Shiv Nair and his teammates come together in a suburban warehouse turned training facility to practice cricket.

The 13-year-old team captain of the Future Stars School of Cricket Lions has big dreams: “To play cricket for India,” says reporter Rebecca Tan. “To wear the sky-blue uniform of the Indian national team.”

His Virginia-based youth club now boasts almost 100 members, and nearly all are U.S.-born children of parents from South Asia. Demographic shifts are at the core of the game’s growth across the United States — but so is something else.

“Second-generation children of immigrant parents find it a lot easier to identify with the culture of their parents today,” Tan says. 

More on this topic:

About Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.