After detention in a Chinese internment camp, a new life
In Xinjiang, the Chinese government has targeted Uighurs and other Turkic Muslims by turning the vast region into a laboratory for mass surveillance. More than 1 million people are in internment camps, according to U.S. and human rights groups estimates. 

Not many Uighurs escape the checkpoints and security cameras. Fewer still make it all the way to the United States.  But by some miracle, says reporter Emily Rauhala, one woman named Zumrat Dawut survived internment and fled to the United States with her husband and three children. Now they live in the Virginia suburbs, where they are waiting to hear whether they will be granted asylum. 

Dawut shared her journey with Rauhala this summer, but she was hesitant about the publicity it would bring her family.

“She was weighing her responsibility to her family and then this sense that she’d had when she was in detention,” Rauhala says, “of ‘why isn’t anyone doing anything about this, why isn’t anyone speaking?’ She said that’s why she ultimately decided to tell her story.”

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Evidence of cruelty finds a digital home
Earlier this month, the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington secured copies of rare recordings and documents from the postwar Nuremberg trials in Germany, after a years-long digitization process.

The dozens of films, hours of tape and a quarter of a million pages of documents were stored for decades by the International Court of Justice. They provide a firsthand account of the famous postwar Nuremberg trials in Germany. 
“We’ve all read about these horrors,” reporter Michael Ruane says. “But to hear it from the perpetrators themselves — and the eyewitnesses — is really stunning.”

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After detention in a Chinese internment camp, a new life
In Xinjiang, the Chinese government has targeted Uighurs and other Turkic Muslims by turning the vast region into a laboratory for mass surveillance. More than 1 million people are in internment camps, according to U.S. and human rights groups estimates. 

Not many Uighurs escape the checkpoints and security cameras. Fewer still make it all the way to the United States.  But by some miracle, says reporter Emily Rauhala, one woman named Zumrat Dawut survived internment and fled to the United States with her husband and three children. Now they live in the Virginia suburbs, where they are waiting to hear whether they will be granted asylum. 

Dawut shared her journey with Rauhala this summer, but she was hesitant about the publicity it would bring her family.

“She was weighing her responsibility to her family and then this sense that she’d had when she was in detention,” Rauhala says, “of ‘why isn’t anyone doing anything about this, why isn’t anyone speaking?’ She said that’s why she ultimately decided to tell her story.”

More on this topic:

Evidence of cruelty finds a digital home
Earlier this month, the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington secured copies of rare recordings and documents from the postwar Nuremberg trials in Germany, after a years-long digitization process.

The dozens of films, hours of tape and a quarter of a million pages of documents were stored for decades by the International Court of Justice. They provide a firsthand account of the famous postwar Nuremberg trials in Germany. 
“We’ve all read about these horrors,” reporter Michael Ruane says. “But to hear it from the perpetrators themselves — and the eyewitnesses — is really stunning.”

More on this topic:
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Shane Harris recaps the second week of public impeachment hearings. Jay Greene examines the vast counterfeit-product market on Amazon.
Thursday, November 21, 2019
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Michael Scherer with a look into how Mike Bloomberg’s wealth could influence the 2020 race. Todd Frankel reports on an agency struggling with an internal dispute over crib bumpers. And Alex Horton on a powerful weapon’s role in the impeachment inquiry.
Monday, November 25, 2019