Trump, Giuliani and a guy called Lev

The Senate gavels in for the impeachment trial. Paul Sonne unpacks the latest evidence implicating President Trump in the Ukraine scandal. Drew Harwell on the tech companies manufacturing diversity. And Philip Bump brings us the “Impeachment Polka.”
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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the premier daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Every weekday afternoon.

In this episode

The new evidence looming over the start of the impeachment trial
The impeachment trial of President Trump began in the Senate today with lots of pomp and circumstance, overshadowed by fallout from new revelations about Ukraine. 

National security reporter Paul Sonne says that a new trove of documents and text messages released by House Democrats on Wednesday evening show how Lev Parnas, an associate of Rudolph W. Giuliani, used the extensive entree he had to Trump’s world to help put in motion a shadow foreign policy campaign in Ukraine.

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Artificially diverse
Tech start-ups are selling images of computer-generated people of color, offering companies a chance to create imaginary models and “increase diversity” in their ads, without needing actual human models.

Artificial intelligence reporter Drew Harwell reports that for some companies, this fake diversity might be an appealing alternative to the real thing. 

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The ‘Impeachment Polka’
After the assassination of Abraham Lincoln in 1865, Andrew Johnson took over the presidency.

“He’s not terribly popular, and he gets in a pretty protracted brawl with Congress and ends up facing impeachment,” political correspondent Philip Bump says. 

“This was a huge event in American culture,” Bump says –– so much so that musicians of the time wrote “Impeachment Polka.” Bump came across the sheet music, and decided to get a musician to play it to see how it sounds. 

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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the premier daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Every weekday afternoon.