Post Reports

Trump touts law freeing inmates. But the Justice Department wants them behind bars.

Neena Satija on the tensions underlying a major piece of criminal justice legislation. Amber Phillips outlines what comes next in the impeachment process. And Antonia Noori Farzan describes how one town is addressing its “food desert.”
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Post Reports is the premier daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Every weekday afternoon.

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White House, Justice Department at odds over criminal justice law
President Trump has repeatedly pointed to the First Step Act — a law addressing long-standing disparities in punishment for nonviolent drug offenses that has led to the release of more than 3,000 federal inmates — as one of his administration’s chief bipartisan achievements, and one for which he is personally responsible. 

But several cases have exposed a rift between White House allies who supported the law and Justice Department officials now working to limit the number of inmates — like Tanesha Bannister and Gregory Allen, with whom the president has appeared at events — who benefit from it.

“There’s a lot of confusion and lives at stake,” says investigative reporter Neena Satija. “I’ve talked to people who could spend the rest of their lives in prison who otherwise might not have.”

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What’s next in the impeachment inquiry
After two weeks of public hearings, House Intelligence Committee investigators are drafting a report summarizing the evidence they have found related to President Trump’s conduct toward Ukraine — one that will inform the House Judiciary Committee after Congress returns from the Thanksgiving recess. 

But recent court rulings and separate investigations could complicate things further, says political analyst Amber Phillips.

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Another tool in the food-access advocate’s toolbox
When the only grocery store in Baldwin shut down last year, residents of the rural northeastern-Florida outpost were left with few options. So their newly installed mayor came to his colleagues with an unconventional proposal: What if the town opened its own communally-run grocery store, with employees on the municipal payroll?

“In other communities we’ve seen that have the same problem with rural food access, we’ve seen them forming co-ops that are run by residents,” says reporter Antonia Noori Farzan. “We’ve seen nonprofits open up their own grocery stores. What’s different in Baldwin is the grocery store is actually owned and run by the town.”

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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the premier daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Every weekday afternoon.