Why Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats was a ‘dead man walking’
Rep. John Ratcliffe (R-Tex.), a third-term congressman, has been tapped by the president to replace Daniel Coats as director of national intelligence next month. 

Coats’s resignation comes after several public disagreements with the president on his meetings with Russia’s Vladimir Putin and other national security threats. Meanwhile, his would-be successor has made a name in Congress as one of the Republican Party’s most dogged critics of perceived anti-Trump bias at the FBI and in the special counsel’s investigation of the Trump campaign’s Russia ties. 

“Any intelligence chief has to be able to look the president in the eyes and say, ‘This is what’s happening when it comes to threat X, Y, and Z,’ ” intelligence reporter Shane Harris says. His willingness to do that will be of interest to senators at his confirmation hearing.

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The surge of troll farms in the Philippines
Across the Philippines, there’s a virtual free-for-all in the use of Internet trolls to spread divisive messages – about companies, celebrities and politicians on both sides. 

Newly harnessed by established PR firms, these trolls have become a powerful force in altering the political landscape of the Philippines, shielded by politicians who refuse to legislate against them because of their influence over corporate and political campaigns worldwide.

“It’s become so widespread that politicians on all sides of the aisle, even liberal politicians who have themselves been victims of these practices, are turning to these services simply to get elected,” says reporter Shibani Mahtani.

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Game changer: ‘Running with the Devil’
A desert race in the Mojave serves as a preview of what precautions athletes and organizers may need to take to deal with Earth’s rising temperatures. Climatologists predict increasingly oppressive conditions, says sports reporter Rick Maese

He’s been reporting on how the changing climate is transforming the world of sports and its extreme athletes and says, “The sports world needs to start readying itself.” 

More on this topic:
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Why Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats was a ‘dead man walking’
Rep. John Ratcliffe (R-Tex.), a third-term congressman, has been tapped by the president to replace Daniel Coats as director of national intelligence next month. 

Coats’s resignation comes after several public disagreements with the president on his meetings with Russia’s Vladimir Putin and other national security threats. Meanwhile, his would-be successor has made a name in Congress as one of the Republican Party’s most dogged critics of perceived anti-Trump bias at the FBI and in the special counsel’s investigation of the Trump campaign’s Russia ties. 

“Any intelligence chief has to be able to look the president in the eyes and say, ‘This is what’s happening when it comes to threat X, Y, and Z,’ ” intelligence reporter Shane Harris says. His willingness to do that will be of interest to senators at his confirmation hearing.

More on this topic:

The surge of troll farms in the Philippines
Across the Philippines, there’s a virtual free-for-all in the use of Internet trolls to spread divisive messages – about companies, celebrities and politicians on both sides. 

Newly harnessed by established PR firms, these trolls have become a powerful force in altering the political landscape of the Philippines, shielded by politicians who refuse to legislate against them because of their influence over corporate and political campaigns worldwide.

“It’s become so widespread that politicians on all sides of the aisle, even liberal politicians who have themselves been victims of these practices, are turning to these services simply to get elected,” says reporter Shibani Mahtani.

More on this topic:

Game changer: ‘Running with the Devil’
A desert race in the Mojave serves as a preview of what precautions athletes and organizers may need to take to deal with Earth’s rising temperatures. Climatologists predict increasingly oppressive conditions, says sports reporter Rick Maese

He’s been reporting on how the changing climate is transforming the world of sports and its extreme athletes and says, “The sports world needs to start readying itself.” 

More on this topic:
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Lisa Bonos on an author working to make the romance genre more inclusive of people on the autism spectrum. And Travis M. Andrews on why you should stop pretending to like outdoor concerts.
Friday, July 26, 2019
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Karoun Demirjian paints a grim picture of election security. Sam Schmidt on the 2020 Democrats flaunting Spanish skills — and the Latino candidate who isn’t. Plus, Marina Lopes explains Brazil’s C-section parties.
Tuesday, July 30, 2019