Tulsa, 100 years later
A sign for Black Wall Street is displayed above the Greenwood Avenue sign in Tulsa. Today, only a small amount of Black-owned businesses remain along Greenwood Avenue. (Joshua Lott/The Washington Post)
In 1921, a White mob descended on the Greenwood district of Tulsa, killing scores of African Americans, and looting and burning their businesses to the ground. The Tulsa massacre decimated Greenwood, a commercial hub once hailed as the height of Black enterprise. 

But as Tracy Jan reports, Black erasure in Tulsa is hardly a remnant of the past. Today, Black entrepreneurs in historic Greenwood feel threatened yet again, as gentrification drives up property values and Black business owners get priced out of land ownership — and some of them are asking why there still hasn’t been restitution for the past. 

In case you missed it: On Friday’s episode of Post Reports, we went in deep on the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. With firsthand accounts from Post journalists, members of Congress and police, we reconstructed the events of that day, and answered some big questions about how it happened, why it happened and what might happen in the future. If you haven’t heard it yet, definitely go back to take a listen. That episode from Friday is called “Four hours of insurrection.”
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Tulsa, 100 years later
A sign for Black Wall Street is displayed above the Greenwood Avenue sign in Tulsa. Today, only a small amount of Black-owned businesses remain along Greenwood Avenue. (Joshua Lott/The Washington Post)
In 1921, a White mob descended on the Greenwood district of Tulsa, killing scores of African Americans, and looting and burning their businesses to the ground. The Tulsa massacre decimated Greenwood, a commercial hub once hailed as the height of Black enterprise. 

But as Tracy Jan reports, Black erasure in Tulsa is hardly a remnant of the past. Today, Black entrepreneurs in historic Greenwood feel threatened yet again, as gentrification drives up property values and Black business owners get priced out of land ownership — and some of them are asking why there still hasn’t been restitution for the past. 

In case you missed it: On Friday’s episode of Post Reports, we went in deep on the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. With firsthand accounts from Post journalists, members of Congress and police, we reconstructed the events of that day, and answered some big questions about how it happened, why it happened and what might happen in the future. If you haven’t heard it yet, definitely go back to take a listen. That episode from Friday is called “Four hours of insurrection.”
Previous Episode
Today, we reconstruct the riot inside the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 — hearing from the lawmakers, journalists and law enforcement officials who were there, and answering lingering questions about how things went so wrong.
Friday, January 15, 2021
Next Episode
Why the nation’s capital feels like a ghost town. What President-elect Joe Biden wants to get done on his first day in office. And why the Secret Service has been paying $3,000 a month for a bathroom.
Tuesday, January 19, 2021