Two weeks later, a clearer picture of the Ukraine scandal
The House Intelligence Committee heard from two experts in U.S.-Ukraine affairs Thursday, starting with testimony from former National Security Council Russia adviser Fiona Hill about breaches of normal conduct that concerned her. 

David Holmes, counselor for political affairs at the U.S. Embassy in Ukraine, also testified, describing a phone call in which President Trump asked about “investigations,” as well as the concern of the embassy as it became clear that the president was pressuring Ukraine to investigate Democratic rivals.

“I think one of the most remarkable things is the facts are not really in dispute here,” intelligence reporter Shane Harris says. “Even Republican members, who are the most defensive of the president in this story, aren’t really disputing that what these witnesses say is accurate or to the best of their recollection is accurate. It’s really about the interpretation of these facts.”

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Why Amazon fails to sniff out fakes
Who among us hasn’t checked to see whether, somewhere in the deep corners of the Internet, there’s a deal on a pair of boots, a cool watch or a protein supplement that you couldn’t get elsewhere? 

As technology writer Jay Greene reports, sometimes those deals exist only because those items are fakes. “And it’s remarkable to me how absolutely easy it is to find obvious counterfeit items on Amazon,” a company he says has invested less than what legitimate sellers would hope to combat the sale of knockoffs. 

(Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos owns The Washington Post.)

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Two weeks later, a clearer picture of the Ukraine scandal
The House Intelligence Committee heard from two experts in U.S.-Ukraine affairs Thursday, starting with testimony from former National Security Council Russia adviser Fiona Hill about breaches of normal conduct that concerned her. 

David Holmes, counselor for political affairs at the U.S. Embassy in Ukraine, also testified, describing a phone call in which President Trump asked about “investigations,” as well as the concern of the embassy as it became clear that the president was pressuring Ukraine to investigate Democratic rivals.

“I think one of the most remarkable things is the facts are not really in dispute here,” intelligence reporter Shane Harris says. “Even Republican members, who are the most defensive of the president in this story, aren’t really disputing that what these witnesses say is accurate or to the best of their recollection is accurate. It’s really about the interpretation of these facts.”

More on this topic:

Why Amazon fails to sniff out fakes
Who among us hasn’t checked to see whether, somewhere in the deep corners of the Internet, there’s a deal on a pair of boots, a cool watch or a protein supplement that you couldn’t get elsewhere? 

As technology writer Jay Greene reports, sometimes those deals exist only because those items are fakes. “And it’s remarkable to me how absolutely easy it is to find obvious counterfeit items on Amazon,” a company he says has invested less than what legitimate sellers would hope to combat the sale of knockoffs. 

(Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos owns The Washington Post.)

More on this topic:
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Political reporters Michael Scherer, Annie Linskey and Cleve Wootson break down key moments from Wednesday’s Democratic primary debate in Atlanta.
Thursday, November 21, 2019
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Emily Rauhala tracks the plight of a Uighur family that escaped internment in western China. And Michael Ruane describes a newly digitized wealth of recordings and documents from the postwar Nuremberg Trial.
Friday, November 22, 2019