Post Reports

What John Bolton’s departure means for Trump’s foreign policy

John Hudson on the ouster of national security adviser John Bolton. Reed Albergotti describes Apple’s dual role in the app economy. And Lena Sun breaks down the chemical linked to recent vaping-related illnesses and deaths.
Listen for free

About Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.

In this episode

The brewing tensions that led to John Bolton’s departure
President Trump announced on Tuesday that he had fired John Bolton, his third national security adviser since taking office. The message came after months of disagreement between Bolton and members of the administration over how to handle major foreign policy challenges such as North Korea and Afghanistan. 

The two men offered different accounts of the ouster. Bolton responded to the president’s announcement with a rebuttal tweet and told The Post: “Let’s be clear, I resigned, having offered to do so last night.”

“We’re turning the page on the Bolton era, which advocated for the most aggressive possible responses to America’s adversaries,” says national security reporter John Hudson. “Who comes next is a big open-ended question.” 

Trump said in a tweet that he would name a replacement next week. 

More on this topic:

What happens when Apple copies popular app ideas
App developers have come to accept that, without warning, Apple can make their work obsolete by announcing new features that use or incorporate their ideas.

Some developers have buckled under the pressure, in some cases opting to shut down instead of facing a protracted battle with the tech giant whose platform they depend on. The imbalance of power reflects the industry’s long history of imitation and the platform’s access to a trove of data no one else has, says tech reporter Reed Albergotti.

More on this topic:

Vaping-related illnesses are on the rise, health officials warn
Amid a surge of cases that have left five people dead and 450 potentially affected, state and federal health officials have linked a mysterious lung illness to vaping. 

While no specific e-cigarette products have been linked to the disorder, officials from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say that a chemical exposure is probably associated with the illness.

“Advocates say, ‘Well, it’s safer than smoking a regular cigarette because there’s not all that tar,’ ” says health reporter Lena H. Sun. “But nobody has really looked deeply or researched the long-term health effects of inhaling all this other stuff into your lungs.”

More on this topic:

About Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.