Post Reports

What the opioid crackdown means for chronic pain patients

Joel Achenbach reports on chronic pain and opioids. Sarah Kaplan on how American teens are channeling their anxiety over climate change into activism. And Max Bearak visits a Kenyan community whose members say its source of power was stolen.
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Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.

In this episode

Chronic pain patients caught in the pendulum swing on opioids
To mitigate the opioid epidemic, prescribing guidelines have changed. This has left some patients confused and struggling to function without the opioids they say they need. 

“Once you go down a certain path, it’s not like you can just stop and turn around,” health and science reporter Joel Achenbach says. “Millions of people were put on these opioids to treat chronic pain, and they are dependent on them.”

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Climate change fear spurs teenagers into action
The latest Washington Post-Kaiser Family Foundation poll shows that a majority of American teens believe that climate change is driven by humans, and that Earth’s changing climate will personally harm them and their generation. 

Science reporter Sarah Kaplan says that roughly 1 in 4 teens are channeling that anxiety into activism, a notable number for a demographic too young to vote. 

The poll is the first major look at teenager’s views of climate change, Kaplan writes, since the explosion of the youth climate movement last year. Kaplan spoke with 16-year-old Swedish activist Greta Thunberg, who inspired the movement. Thunberg is urging students worldwide to be part of a classroom walkout and demand more aggressive climate-change policy when a major U.N. summit convenes in the next several days. 

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Kenyan drum 
A massive drum that is the source of power for the Pokomo people in Kenya was taken by the British more than a century ago. The tribe elders believe that since then, the Pokomos’ power has diminished. But now, the tribe wants it back. 

Nairobi bureau chief Max Bearak explains that the drum has been sitting in a storage facility in London and that no living Pokomo have even heard the drum. 

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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.