Post Reports

What Tuesday’s election results could mean for 2020

Robert Costa with the major takeaways from Tuesday’s elections. Abby Ohlheiser explains how a tracking app is transforming parent-child relationships. Plus, Rick Noack on what a 10-year-old burger says about capitalism.
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Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.

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Understanding Tuesday’s elections 
Democrats claimed victories in closely watched states after Tuesday’s elections.

For the first time in a generation, the swing state of Virginia has gone from purple to blue. Democrats in Kentucky are calling their bid for governorship a win. And in Pennsylvania, Democratic influence can be seen chipping away at the Philadelphia suburbs.

“The suburban vote is critical for the Democrats in 2020,” says national political reporter Robert Costa. “So many suburban voters, just as we saw in 2018, remain hesitant about the GOP. And President Trump's base is turning up now. But that's not enough, even in Kentucky, at times to save the Republican Party.”

While Republicans did well in other local Kentucky elections, the potential unseating of Republican governor was unsurprising, Costa says. “Matt Bevin was unpopular.” But Costa adds that Bevin’s close political ties to the president raise questions as to whether Tuesday’s elections foreshadow a difficult election for the GOP in 2020.

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Life under Life360
Life360 is a tracking app that parents use to monitor their kids, using it to track where they are, even how fast they’re driving. 

It’s a safety precaution in some minds; a snitch in others. And digital culture reporter Abby Ohlheiser says it has created an interesting tension between parents and their Generation Z kids.

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The last McDonald’s burger in Iceland
Purchased hours before McDonald’s pulled out of Iceland in 2009, the last surviving McDonald’s burger has become much more than a burger. 

A live stream of the burger, which never seems to decompose, has fascinated viewers worldwide; at its peak, it drew 2 million viewers a month. Ten years after its purchase, the burger and fries still look eerily fresh. 

To people in Iceland though, foreign affairs reporter Rick Noack says, the burger represents more than the dangers of fast food. It stands for the greed and excessive capitalism that caused an economic crisis so bad that even McDonald’s shut down.

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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.