Post Reports

Whistleblower allegation against Trump revives the call for impeachment

Rachael Bade explains whether impeachment is on the table after a whistleblower complaint. Gerry Shih on the new targets of China’s crackdown against Muslims. And Zachary Pincus-Roth examines the continued watchability of “The Shawshank Redemption.”
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Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.

In this episode

House Democrats try to move the needle on impeachment
On Sunday, President Trump acknowledged that he discussed former vice president Joe Biden and his son Hunter during a phone call with Ukraine’s leader. 

His admission came amid renewed pressure on House Democrats to begin impeachment hearings over allegations that the president had leaned on foreign governments to investigate one of his potential 2020 opponents. 

“There’s a shift in sentiment right now,” says congressional reporter Rachael Bade. “I started seeing on Friday, for the first time ever, a bunch of House Democrats go on record and say: We look weak. We look feckless. We are undermining our own branch of government by not sticking up to Trump.”

House Speaker House Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) has been unwilling to press for impeachment but on Sunday called for the director of national intelligence to turn over the whistleblower complaint detailing Trump’s interactions with Ukraine. She stopped short, however, of threatening impeachment if the administration refuses to comply. 

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China cracks down on Hui Muslims
Under President Xi Jinping, China’s government has intensified its efforts to “Sinicize” the country, or make a more homogenous, secular China. Authorities have targeted ethnic minorities to curtail religions, such as Islam, that they consider to be carriers of foreign influence. 

For two years on the Xinjiang frontier, China has sent hundreds of thousands of Uighurs to what it calls “reeducation centers,” where they are taught to renounce their religion and culture and embrace new state-prescribed identities as secular Chinese. 

Now, the government has accelerated its campaign to target another Muslim minority, says China correspondent Gerry Shih: the Hui.

“[Xi Jinping] has wanted to make China great again through what he calls the China Dream,” Shih says. This campaign is part of that “long-foretold rejuvenation of the Chinese nation.” 

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‘You really want to believe in those things’
“People ask me my favorite movie and I want to say ‘The Shawshank Redemption,’ but it’s also kind of a cliche favorite movie,” says Style features editor Zachary Pincus-Roth. “It’s the number-one movie on IMDb in terms of user rankings, so me saying ‘The Shawshank Redemption’ is my favorite movie — well, it’s everyone’s favorite movie.” 

And it may be. Twenty-five years after it failed in the box office, “Shawshank” has emerged as an unlikely entry in the contest for the most beloved movie of all time. It’s one that’s inspired tattoos and moved fans to make pilgrimages to the town in Ohio that once pretended to be a town in Maine.

“I think part of it was how this movie was just arguing for all of the good things in life to win out in the end,” Pincus-Roth says, “for justice and kindness, and making the most of your life, and hope, and all of these things. And so I think the movie was sort of aspirational in that way, at least for me.”

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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post -- for your ears.