Federal prison without the government
Kimberly Kindy is an investigative reporter with The Washington Post. And she’s been reporting on how the nearly month-long partial government shutdown — the longest in history — has been affecting all parts of the federal government.

Including one of the most dangerous law enforcement jobs out there: that of federal prison worker.

More on this topic:

Women’s March fractures before the third annual gathering
Two years ago, millions across the globe turned out for a day of demonstration. The Women’s March took place in opposition to the newly elected President Trump. But on the eve of the third annual march, the national organization faces criticism from local groups as to the effectiveness of the march, who it is for and even who can join.

Marissa Lang reports on local news for The Post. She says recent controversies — including efforts to trademark the name of the march — have alarmed and disenfranchised smaller contingencies of the organization.

The tension, she says, “is a top-down approach, rather than a bottom-up approach.”

More on this topic:

For five minutes on stage, two years repenting
R&B singer Chrisette Michele has spent the last two years trying to come back from the backlash she received after singing at one of President Trump’s inaugural balls.

Cleve R. Wootson Jr. spoke with her about where her career is headed and why there was such a bitter response in the first place.

More on this topic:
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Federal prison without the government
Kimberly Kindy is an investigative reporter with The Washington Post. And she’s been reporting on how the nearly month-long partial government shutdown — the longest in history — has been affecting all parts of the federal government.

Including one of the most dangerous law enforcement jobs out there: that of federal prison worker.

More on this topic:

Women’s March fractures before the third annual gathering
Two years ago, millions across the globe turned out for a day of demonstration. The Women’s March took place in opposition to the newly elected President Trump. But on the eve of the third annual march, the national organization faces criticism from local groups as to the effectiveness of the march, who it is for and even who can join.

Marissa Lang reports on local news for The Post. She says recent controversies — including efforts to trademark the name of the march — have alarmed and disenfranchised smaller contingencies of the organization.

The tension, she says, “is a top-down approach, rather than a bottom-up approach.”

More on this topic:

For five minutes on stage, two years repenting
R&B singer Chrisette Michele has spent the last two years trying to come back from the backlash she received after singing at one of President Trump’s inaugural balls.

Cleve R. Wootson Jr. spoke with her about where her career is headed and why there was such a bitter response in the first place.

More on this topic:
Previous Episode
David Fahrenthold on a government watchdog report questioning the constitutionality of Trump’s D.C. hotel lease. William Booth on Britain's many attempts to leave the European Union. Plus, the history of the border wall.
Thursday, January 17, 2019
Next Episode
Six decades after Minnijean Brown became one of the Little Rock Nine, one of the first nine black students to desegregate a high school in Little Rock, Ark., she has a new mission: showing the world just how scared she was as it happened.
Monday, January 21, 2019