Post Reports

Why President Trump is shutting down his charity

President Trump’s charity will shut down amid allegations that he used it for personal and political gain. In the second part of our Murder With Impunity series, the police perspective. And a retired school counselor has two and a half minutes of fame.
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Post Reports is the premier daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Every weekday afternoon.

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Trump shuts down charity amid allegations of illegal conduct
President Trump will shut down his embattled charity and give away its remaining money, New York Attorney General Barbara Underwood announced Tuesday. Trump had long been dogged by allegations he used the foundation for personal and political advantage.

Post reporter David Fahrenthold has been covering Trump’s charity since the run-up to the Iowa caucuses. He joined Martine Powers to discuss the allegations that the foundation served as little more than a Trump “checkbook.”

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Unsolved, but not a mystery
No one has been arrested for killing Alexander Brown, a 24-year-old in Indianapolis, even though his body was dragged and dumped in broad daylight. His death is hardly an outlier: In a four-block area around his home on Gladstone Avenue, on the northeast side of Indianapolis, there has been a high concentration of homicides since 2007. Only one has led to an arrest.

Two years later, Brown’s slaying remains unsolved, like many others in the same neighborhood, raising a lot of questions in the city. And this isn’t unique to Indianapolis -- it’s a phenomenon that exists in cities all over the country. So Dalton Bennett set out to find out what it was like for a police department to investigate a case such as this in an area where the majority of homicides are never solved.

This is the second installment of our three-part series Murder With Impunity. The series began Monday with Kimbriell Kelly’s dispatch from New Orleans.

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People wait a lifetime for a moment like this
In October, Post columnist John Kelly asked readers to share their only-in-Washington bucket-list experiences. This past weekend, one of the people he featured, 74-year-old Cathy Strickler, got to live out hers, playing violin with the National Symphony Orchestra.

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About Post Reports

Post Reports is the premier daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Every weekday afternoon.