House Oversight Committee member Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) is leading the impeachment effort. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Update: This post, originally published in May, has since lost its annotations and we have been unable to retrieve them. The articles of impeachment are below. For more on the impeachment efforts of Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein, read this.

A group of Trump allies in the House are preparing for the possibility of impeaching the person who set up the special counsel investigation into Russia, Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein. They drafted eight reasons why he should be impeached that are based on what legal experts say is highly politicized information. That’s because their impeachment cases rests on what the FBI says is cherry-picked information about how it got multiple warrants to spy on former Trump campaign official Carter Page. Because Attorney General Jeff Sessions has recused himself from the FBI’s Russia investigation, Rosenstein oversees it.

Here are the articles of impeachment, obtained by The Washington Post on Monday, annotated. Click on the highlighted text to read the annotations.

Sets forth articles impeaching Rod Rosenstein, Deputy Attorney General of the United States, stating that Rosenstein:

1. Engaged in a pattern of conduct incompatible with the trust and confidence placed in him in that position by refusing to comply with a subpoena issued by the House Committee on the Judiciary on March 22, 2018 in connection to the congressional investigation seeking documents and information related to potential abuses of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act;

2. Failed to enforce multiple laws; including improper authorization of searches and electronic surveillance under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) and Executive Order 12333 on Intelligence;

3. Failed to act on the behalf of the Attorney General by properly supervising the administration of FISA by failing to demonstrate probable cause to believe that targets of surveillance were a foreign power or agents of a foreign power, that a significant purpose of the surveillance was to obtain foreign intelligence information, and that appropriate minimization procedures were in place;

4. Failed his oath of office by refusing to discipline or recommend the removal of DOJ personnel after obtaining evidence of disqualifying conflicts of interest demonstrated throughout the course of the ongoing investigation regarding charging decisions in the investigation surrounding former Secretary Clinton’s private email server in 2016;

5. Knowingly provided misleading statements related to his supervision of the initial Department of Justice investigation into the Trump campaign’s alleged contacts with Russia when he testified under oath before Congress on December 13, 2017 that any involvement FBI attorney Bruce Ohr had in the Russian investigation was without his knowledge;

6. Failed to recuse himself from supervising the Department of Justice’s response to the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform and the House Committee on the Judiciary’s joint congressional investigation seeking documents related to potential abuses of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act when his fairness or objectivity could reasonably be questioned after he had supervised the application process for the potentially improper FISA warrants at issue in the investigation;

7. Knowingly and intentionally prevented the production of documents and information to the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform and the House Committee in an effort to delay and impede the congressional investigation into potential abuses of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act; and

8. Knowingly and intentionally prevented the production of all documents and information dated between December 2016-May 2017 in an effort to delay and impede the production of information referring and relating to the FBI and broader Department of Justice’s initial investigation into the Trump campaign’s alleged contacts with Russia.