The House Democratic vote overwhelmingly nominating Nancy Pelosi for speaker this week signaled unity in a party that was anything but unified on Pelosi’s candidacy during the 2018 campaign.

Nearly a third of the 203 Democrats who voted for Pelosi behind closed doors Wednesday changed their position on her candidacy over the past month, according to a Fix analysis. Most of those had dodged questions or been noncommittal when asked about supporting Pelosi during the 2018 campaign, and some waited until the day of the caucus vote to declare their support.

The late-shifting support for Pelosi was the latest illustration of the California Democrat’s staying power in her caucus but also an illustration of how polarizing she continues to be with voters, as The Fix’s Colby Itkowitz breaks down in the video above.

Of the 66 Democrats who dodged questions about Pelosi in the lead-up to the caucus vote, 37 were incoming freshmen. Only three had previously committed to voting “no” on Pelosi before voting “yes” on Wednesday (Rashida Tlaib told CNN in August she would “probably not” vote for Pelosi before voting “yes” behind closed doors).

Eight Democrats in the Problem Solvers Caucus threatened to vote against Pelosi before reaching a deal the day of the caucus vote, and Rep. Stephen F. Lynch (Mass.) signed a letter vowing to oppose Pelosi but told the Hill on Thursday that he is now leaning toward backing Pelosi in January.

The 32 Democrats who voted against Pelosi on Wednesday (35, if you include the three who returned blank ballots) are likely enough to block her nomination in January. But the number of Democrats whom Pelosi needs to pick off before then may actually be smaller, considering that her team reportedly told some freshmen Democrats to vote “no” behind closed doors to keep promises made during the campaign to oppose Pelosi.

It is also unclear how many will vote “no” if no Democratic challenger emerges. And considering that recent challengers often fail to attain a congressional leadership position for themselves, there may not be enough incentive for an alternative to Nancy Pelosi.

At least 66 incoming and returning House Democrats voted for Nancy Pelosi for speaker after previously dodging questions about her candidacy. Click on the names below to see what each said previously about Pelosi.

  1. Terri A. Sewell (Alabama’s 7th Congressional District)
  2. Tom O’Halleran (Arizona’s 1st Congressional District)
  3. Ann Kirkpatrick (Arizona’s 2nd Congressional District)
  4. Raúl M. Grijalva (Arizona’s 3rd Congressional District)
  5. Jim Costa (California’s 16th Congressional District)
  6. Salud Carbajal (California’s 24th Congressional District)
  7. Katie Hill (California’s 25th Congressional District)
  8. Katie Porter (California’s 45th Congressional District)
  9. Harley Rouda (California’s 48th Congressional District)
  10. Diana DeGette (Colorado’s 1st Congressional District)
  11. Joe Neguse (Colorado’s 2nd Congressional District)
  12. Joe Courtney (Connecticut’s 2nd Congressional District)
  13. Jim Himes (Connecticut’s 4th Congressional District)
  14. Jahana Hayes (Connecticut’s 5th Congressional District)
  15. Stephanie Murphy (Florida’s 7th Congressional District)
  16. Darren Soto (Florida’s 9th Congressional District)
  17. Donna Shalala (Florida’s 27th Congressional District)
  18. Lucy McBath (Georgia’s 6th Congressional District)
  19. Daniel Lipinski (Illinois’s 3rd Congressional District)
  20. Jesus “Chuy” Garcia (Illinois’s 4th Congressional District)
  21. Sean Casten (Illinois’s 6th Congressional District)
  22. Raja Krishnamoorthi (Illinois’s 8th Congressional District)
  23. Bradley Schneider (Illinois’s 10th Congressional District)
  24. Lauren Underwood (Illinois’s 14th Congressional District)
  25. Abby Finkenauer (Iowa’s 1st Congressional District)
  26. David Loebsack (Iowa’s 2nd Congressional District)
  27. Cindy Axne (Iowa’s 3rd Congressional District)
  28. Sharice Davids (Kansas’s 3rd Congressional District)
  29. Lori Trahan (Massachusetts’s 3rd Congressional District)
  30. Ayanna Pressley (Massachusetts’s 7th Congressional District)
  31. William R. Keating (Massachusetts’s 9th Congressional District)
  32. David Trone (Maryland’s 6th Congressional District)
  33. Andy Levin (Michigan’s 9th Congressional District)
  34. Rashida Tlaib (Michigan’s 13th Congressional District)
  35. Angie Craig (Minnesota’s 2nd Congressional District)
  36. Ilhan Omar (Minnesota’s 5th Congressional District)
  37. Chris Pappas (New Hampshire’s 1st Congressional District)
  38. Josh Gottheimer (New Jersey’s 5th Congressional District)
  39. Tom Malinowski (New Jersey’s 7th Congressional District)
  40. Bill Pascrell Jr. (New Jersey’s 9th Congressional District)
  41. Debra Haaland (New Mexico’s 1st Congressional District)
  42. Xochitl Torres Small (New Mexico’s 2nd Congressional District)
  43. Susie Lee (Nevada’s 3rd Congressional District)
  44. Thomas Suozzi (New York’s 3rd Congressional District)
  45. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (New York’s 14th Congressional District)
  46. Antonio Delgado (New York’s 19th Congressional District)
  47. Joseph Morelle (New York’s 25th Congressional District)
  48. Brian Higgins (New York’s 26th Congressional District)
  49. Marcia L. Fudge (Ohio’s 11th Congressional District)
  50. Brendan Boyle (Pennsylvania’s 2nd Congressional District)
  51. Madeleine Dean (Pennsylvania’s 4th Congressional District)
  52. Mary Gay Scanlon (Pennsylvania’s 5th Congressional District)
  53. Chrissy Houlahan (Pennsylvania’s 6th Congressional District)
  54. Susan Wild (Pennsylvania’s 7th Congressional District)
  55. Lizzie Pannill Fletcher (Texas’s 7th Congressional District)
  56. Vicente Gonzalez (Texas’s 15th Congressional District)
  57. Veronica Escobar (Texas’s 16th Congressional District)
  58. Sylvia Garcia (Texas’s 29th Congressional District)
  59. Eddie Bernice Johnson (Texas’s 30th Congressional District)
  60. Colin Allred (Texas’s 32nd Congressional District)
  61. Elaine Luria (Virginia’s 2nd Congressional District)
  62. Jennifer Wexton (Virginia’s 10th Congressional District)
  63. Peter Welch (Vermont’s At-large Congressional District)
  64. Pramila Jayapal (Washington’s 7th Congressional District)
  65. Kim Schrier (Washington’s 8th Congressional District)
  66. Mark Pocan (Wisconsin’s 2nd Congressional District)