From left, Dina Powell, Steve Bannon, H.R. McMaster, and Reince Priebus listen on Wednesday, April 12, 2017. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

On Monday morning, President Trump’s former personal attorney Michael Cohen got into a car in Manhattan to report to the prison where he’ll serve a multiyear sentence for a number of federal crimes. It was probably the highest-profile example of a change in fortunes among those who’ve at one point been close to or worked for Trump, but it’s only one of many such changes.

There have been a remarkable number of firings and resignations from the Trump administration, the most recent of which occurred less than a month ago, as of writing. Trump has lost multiple Cabinet officials, four communications directors, two chiefs of staff and any number of other high-profile officials and advisers. The White House has cycled through so many bold-faced names that we figured it was about time to check in on all of them. Where, exactly, are all of those former Trump officials now?

We picked out 34 former administration officials to track, setting aside another two dozen whose names are probably less familiar to the public. If, however, there’s someone you’re curious about, feel free to reach out.

January–June 2017

Michael Flynn. Worked for 25 days as national security adviser. Left because he was fired after it was revealed that he’d lied to the vice president.

Where is he now? Unclear. Flynn is awaiting sentencing for having lied to federal investigators about his contacts with Russia’s ambassador. He has been cooperating with various probes, including the recently completed one led by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III.

Katie Walsh. Worked for 70 days as deputy chief of staff. Left because she resigned.

Where is she now? Politics. Walsh is now a senior adviser to the Republican National Committee and to a pro-Trump PAC.

K.T. McFarland. Worked for 80 days as deputy national security adviser. Left because she was asked to resign after Flynn’s departure.

Where is she now? Unclear. McFarland continues to make occasional appearances in the media.

Michael Dubke. Worked for 119 days as White House communications director. Left because he resigned to return to the private sector.

Where is he now? Politics. Dubke returned to Black Rock Group, a political consulting firm he helped found.

July–December 2017

Sean Spicer. Worked for 183 days as White House press secretary. Left because he quit when Anthony Scaramucci was hired as communications director.

Where is he now? Media. Earlier this year, Spicer joined the television tabloid program “Extra” as a correspondent.

Reince Priebus. Worked for 190 days as White House chief of staff. Left because he was fired by Trump over Twitter.

Where is he now? Private sector. Priebus is now president and chief strategist for a law firm in D.C.

Anthony Scaramucci. Worked for 11 days as White House communications director. Left because he was fired by incoming chief of staff John Kelly.

Where is he now? Finance. Scaramucci returned to an investment firm he founded called SkyBridge.

Ezra Cohen-Watnick. Worked for 195 days as a senior director on the National Security Council. Left because he resigned when H.R. McMaster took over as national security adviser.

Where is he now? Administration. In April of last year, it was announced that Cohen-Watnick had been hired at the Justice Department to work with then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

Steve Bannon. Worked for 211 days as White House chief strategist. Left because he was fired shortly after the unrest in Charlottesville.

Where is he now? Politics. After briefly returning to Breitbart News, Bannon is actively involved in promoting far-right political parties in Europe and other countries.

Sebastian Gorka. Worked for 214 days as White House deputy assistant. Left because he was fired (he claims he resigned) from a poorly defined role.

Where is he now? Media. Gorka hosts a daily radio show on a conservative radio network. Until recently he had been a Fox News contributor.

Keith Schiller. Worked for 244 days as director of Oval Office operations. Left because he resigned shortly after John Kelly took over as White House chief of staff.

Where is he now? Politics. Schiller’s firm was hired by the Republican Party to aid in identifying a location for the party’s 2020 convention.

Tom Price. Worked for 232 days as Health and Human Services secretary. Left because he resigned following multiple scandals involving his use of private jets.

Where is he now? Private sector. Price joined the advisory board of Jackson Healthcare last year.

January–June 2018

Rick Dearborn. Worked for 347 days as deputy White House chief of staff. Left because he resigned to work in the private sector.

Where is he now? Politics. Dearborn is now the president of an advocacy group pushing for passage of Trump’s revised NAFTA agreement.

Dina Powell. Worked for 354 days as deputy national security adviser. Left because she resigned.

Where is she now? Private sector. Powell now works at Goldman Sachs.

Omarosa Manigault Newman. Worked for 366 days as director of communications for the Office of the Public Liaison. Left because she was fired in spectacular fashion.

Where is she now? Media. Manigault Newman wrote a tell-all book about her time in the White House and has been making media appearances related to it since.

Marc Short. Worked for 546 days as director of legislative affairs. Left because he resigned to return to the private sector.

Where is he now? Administration. After leaving the administration in January of last year, he recently rejoined it to serve as chief of staff to Vice President Pence.

Rob Porter. Worked for 384 days as White House staff secretary. Left because he was fired once it was publicly reported that he’d been accused of assaulting his ex-wife.

Where is he now? Unclear. Shortly after leaving the White House, it was reported that Porter was going to work for a pro-Trump political action committee, a report that was subsequently denied.

Gary Cohn. Worked for 411 days as chief economic adviser. Left because he resigned after disagreeing with Trump’s decision to impose new tariffs.

Where is he now? Academia. Cohn is serving as a temporary fellow at Harvard University’s Institute of Politics.

Rex Tillerson. Worked for 406 days as secretary of state. Left because he was fired by Trump.

Where is he now? Unclear. Tillerson had discussed joining the University of Houston Board of Regents but didn’t do so.

Josh Raffel. Worked for 357 days as deputy communications director. Left because he resigned.

Where is he now? Private sector. Raffel joined the e-cigarette company Juul as vice president of corporate communications last year.

Hope Hicks. Worked for 434 days as White House communications director. Left because she resigned shortly after Porter’s ouster, having helped defend the doomed staff secretary.

Where is she now? Media. Hicks now works at Fox as the company’s chief communications officer.

H.R. McMaster. Worked for 411 days as national security adviser. Left because he was fired following a rocky relationship with Trump.

Where is he now? Academia. McMaster is a visiting fellow at Stanford University’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies.

Tom Bossert. Worked for 446 days as homeland security adviser. Left because he was asked to resign after National Security Adviser John Bolton came to the administration.

Where is he now? Media. Bossert is a contributor to ABC News.

Tom Homan. Worked for 526 days as director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Left because he resigned.

Where is he now? Media. Homan is a contributor at Fox News.

July–December 2018

Scott Pruitt. Worked for 504 days as EPA administrator. Left because he resigned following a truly impressive number of scandals.

Where is he now? Private sector. Pruitt now works as a lobbyist in Indiana, apparently advocating for a coal company.

Don McGahn. Worked for 636 days as White House counsel. Left because he’d successfully helped guide Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court.

Where is he now? Private sector. McGahn now leads government regulation practice at the law firm Jones Day in D.C.

Jeff Sessions. Worked for 639 days as attorney general. Left because he was fired by Trump shortly after the midterm elections.

Where is he now? Unclear. Sessions has floated the idea of running for this old Senate seat in Alabama.

January 2019–present

Nikki Haley. Worked for 706 days as ambassador to the United Nations. Left because she resigned.

Where is she now? Private sector. Haley recently joined the board of directors of Boeing.

James Mattis. Worked for 711 days as secretary of defense. Left because he was essentially fired after announcing his resignation following multiple disagreements with the president.

Where is he now? Academia. Mattis rejoined Stanford University’s Hoover Institution in March.

Ryan Zinke. Worked for 672 days as secretary of interior. Left because he resigned in the face of multiple ethics probes.

Where is he now? Finance. Zinke is now managing director of a cryptocurrency company called Artillery One.

John Kelly. Worked for 712 days as White House chief of staff. Left because he was fired after he and Trump pledged that he’d stay through 2020.

Where is he now? Private sector. Kelly recently joined the board of directors for a company that runs shalters housing minor migrants.

Bill Shine. Worked for 246 days as communications director. Left because he resigned.

Where is he now? Politics. Shine left the White House to aid Trump’s reelection campaign as a senior adviser.

Scott Gottlieb. Worked for 689 days as FDA commissioner. Left because he resigned to spend more time with his family.

Where is he now? Politics. Gottleib rejoined the American Enterprise Institute where he works on drug-pricing policy.

Kirstjen Nielsen. Worked for 488 days as secretary of Homeland Security. Left because she resigned, apparently under pressure.

Where is she now? Unclear. Nielsen only recently resigned her position. There has been a push to pressure organizations not to hire her.

More to come, no doubt.

Lengths of tenure taken from CNN’S overview of administration departures.