The Iowa caucuses will be in the past the next time the Democratic field takes the debate stage, marking a new stage in the 2020 primaries. The Democratic National Committee’s latest debate qualification criteria reflect that.

Who qualified for each debate

June
debate
July Aug. Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. N.H.
so far
Biden Biden Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Blue checkmark
Buttigieg Buttigieg Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Blue checkmark
Klobuchar Klobuchar Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Blue checkmark
Sanders Sanders Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Blue checkmark
Warren Warren Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Blue checkmark
Steyer Steyer Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Blue checkmark
Yang Yang Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Blue checkmark
Gabbard Gabbard Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark
Bennet Bennet Checkmark Checkmark
Bloomberg Bloomberg
Patrick Patrick
Delaney Delaney Checkmark Checkmark Dropped out
Booker Booker Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Dropped out
Castro Castro Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Dropped out
Williamson Williamson Checkmark Checkmark Dropped out
Harris Harris Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Dropped out
Bullock Bullock Checkmark Dropped out
O’Rourke O’Rourke Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Checkmark Dropped out
Ryan Ryan Checkmark Checkmark Dropped out
de Blasio de Blasio Checkmark Checkmark Dropped out
Gillibrand Gillibrand Checkmark Checkmark Dropped out
Hickenlooper Hickenlooper Checkmark Checkmark Dropped out
Inslee Inslee Checkmark Checkmark Dropped out
Swalwell Swalwell Checkmark Dropped out

Candidates who earned enough support in the Iowa caucuses to win at least one delegate automatically qualify for the Feb. 7 debate — the last debate until New Hampshire holds its primaries on Feb. 11. The math that the Iowa Democratic Party uses to award delegates is fairly complicated, but candidates are not likely to receive any delegates if they do not win at least 15 percent support in a number of precincts.

Anyone who does not earn a delegate can still qualify through a combination of polling and unique donors. Candidates must register at least 5 percent in four polls approved by the party between Dec. 13 and Feb. 6, or at least 7 percent in two early-state polls (New Hampshire, South Carolina or Nevada only). They must also earn donations from at least 225,000 unique donors nationally, and a minimum of 1,000 unique donors in at least 20 states, U.S. territories or the District of Columbia.

Candidates on the bubble

5% in four national or early state polls or 7% in two early state polls and Meets donor threshold
Gabbard
6% 5%    
 
   
 
Gabbard
Needs 2 more
or
Needs 2 more
and  

All six candidates who appeared in the January debate have qualified for the New Hampshire debate, plus tech entrepreneur Andrew Yang. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii), who hasn’t been on stage since November, has received two out of four qualifying polls and is approaching the donor threshold.

Former New York mayor Mike Bloomberg has polled at least 5 percent in enough national polls, but his campaign said he won’t accept political donations, which prevents him from reaching the donor threshold. But he may appear on a debate stage soon: The DNC has removed the donor threshold rule for the Feb. 19 debate.

About this report

This analysis is based on rules set by the DNC. Individual donor numbers are reported by the campaigns. Polling totals are based on numbers compiled by Politico.