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In new video, Trump condemns violence without mentioning his second impeachment

The House of Representatives voted on Jan. 13 to impeach President Trump a second time after the deadly U.S. Capitol breach. (Video: The Washington Post, Photo: Melina Mara/The Washington Post)

The House voted 232 to 197 on Wednesday to impeach President Trump an unprecedented second time, on a charge of “inciting violence” against the U.S. government. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) left open the possibility of voting to convict at a trial, which would occur after Trump leaves office next week.

During debate on the House floor, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) said Trump “bears responsibility” for last week’s violent takeover of the Capitol but argued against impeachment so close to the end of his term. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) called Trump “a clear and present danger” and said “he must go.”

Here’s what to know:

  • In his first public statement since getting impeached a second time, Trump condemned violence without mentioning his indictment for inciting the attack at the Capitol. “Violence and vandalism have absolutely no place in our country and no place in our movement,” the president said in a video statement. He warned his supporters that upcoming demonstrations should remain peaceful.
  • President-elect Joe Biden, who takes office next week, has announced no public events Wednesday as Trump’s impeachment is debated on the House floor.
  • An additional 5,000 members of the National Guard could arrive to support Inauguration Day security in Washington, city officials said Wednesday, which would increase the total to at least 20,000 in a rapidly swelling security apparatus focused on the Capitol.
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Here's what to know:

In his first public statement since getting impeached a second time, Trump condemned violence without mentioning his indictment for inciting the attack at the Capitol. “Violence and vandalism have absolutely no place in our country and no place in our movement,” the president said in a video statement. He warned his supporters that upcoming demonstrations should remain peaceful.
President-elect Joe Biden, who takes office next week, has announced no public events Wednesday as Trump’s impeachment is debated on the House floor.
An additional 5,000 members of the National Guard could arrive to support Inauguration Day security in Washington, city officials said Wednesday, which would increase the total to at least 20,000 in a rapidly swelling security apparatus focused on the Capitol.

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The Jan. 6 insurrection

The report: The Jan. 6 committee released its final report, marking the culmination of an 18-month investigation into the violent insurrection. Read The Post’s analysis about the committee’s new findings and conclusions.

The final hearing: The House committee investigating the attack on the U.S. Capitol held its final public meeting where members referred four criminal charges against former president Donald Trump and others to the Justice Department. Here’s what the criminal referrals mean.

The riot: On Jan. 6, 2021, a pro-Trump mob stormed the U.S. Capitol in an attempt to stop the certification of the 2020 election results. Five people died on that day or in the immediate aftermath, and 140 police officers were assaulted.

Inside the siege: During the rampage, rioters came perilously close to penetrating the inner sanctums of the building while lawmakers were still there, including former vice president Mike Pence. The Washington Post examined text messages, photos and videos to create a video timeline of what happened on Jan. 6. Here’s what we know about what Trump did on Jan. 6.

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