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Who’s who in the Jan. 6 committee subpoenas

Members of the Proud Boys, a far-right group with a history of violence, make a “white power” hand gesture while walking near the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. (Amanda Andrade-Rhoades for The Washington Post)
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The House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol has issued dozens of subpoenas since it began work this summer, including requesting documents and testimony from nearly three dozen people who worked with or for the White House in the waning days of Donald Trump’s presidency. Many of those who’ve been sought out for information are people of whom you’ve probably heard, including former Trump adviser Stephen K. Bannon. Others are less well-known; some were largely anonymous before being contacted by the committee.

It seemed useful, then, to walk through the list of individuals from whom the committee wants to hear. As of writing, six batches of subpoenas have been sent to groups of people, each targeting a subset of the day’s activity. Bannon, for example, was subpoenaed in late September; when he failed to appear for a deposition as scheduled, he was cited for contempt of Congress. Other groups focus on the day’s rallies or on Trump’s circles of advisers inside or outside the White House. The bolded terms below are used in the descriptors of those who’ve been targeted with subpoena for easy reference.

  • Senior team, subpoenaed Sept. 23. Four officials and aides close to Trump.
  • Ellipse rally, subpoenaed Sept. 29. A group of activists and staffers involved in the planning of the rally outside the White House on Jan. 6.
  • Hill rally, subpoenaed on Oct. 7. Activists involved in the broader “Stop the Steal” effort and a rally planned for Capitol Hill on Jan. 6.
  • Clark, subpoenaed Oct. 13. Former Justice Department official Jeffrey Clark was subpoenaed independently.
  • Campaign, subpoenaed Nov. 8. A number of people who worked for the Trump campaign and were associated in some way with the rally.
  • White House, subpoenaed Nov. 9. Various staffers from the Trump White House.

In most cases, the House committee explained the rationale for its subpoena requests; we’ve included those descriptors below. In some cases, though, we’ve also added additional useful context for who the targeted individual was and how they fit into the day’s events.

Subpoena recipients

Ali Alexander. Hill rally; deposition scheduled for Oct. 29. Alexander had flitted around the right-wing fringe for years before landing on the “Stop the Steal” rhetoric in the wake of the 2020 presidential election. He helped plan a rally for Capitol Hill on Jan. 6, leveraging the web domain “WildProtest.com” — a reference to Trump’s tweet about how the events of the day would be “wild.” Later, Alexander’s rally was folded into events centered on the day, including the rally outside the White House where Trump spoke and a rally on the evening of Jan. 5. After the riot, he claimed to have been working with several members of Congress on the day’s events.

Committee description:

[I]n the weeks before the January 6th attack, Mr. Alexander made repeated reference during Stop-the-Steal-sponsored events to the possible use of violence to achieve the organization’s goals and claimed to have been in communication with the White House and Members of Congress regarding events planned to coincide with the certification of the 2020 Electoral College results. Additionally, Mr. Alexander reportedly spoke at a rally on January 5th, 2021, held by the Eighty Percent Coalition at Freedom Plaza in Washington, D.C., and led the crowd in a chant of ‘victory, or death.’

Bannon. Senior team; deposition scheduled for Oct. 14. Bannon came to Trump’s 2016 campaign from Breitbart and briefly worked in the Trump White House. After being pardoned by Trump while facing trial on charges of fraud, Bannon centered his attention on boosting Trump’s false claims about election fraud. Bannon was part of a group that gathered Jan. 5 at a hotel near the White House in which efforts to seize a second term for Trump were apparently discussed.

Committee description:

Stephen Bannon reportedly communicated with former President Trump on December 30th, 2020, urging him to focus his efforts on January 6th. Mr. Bannon also reportedly attended a gathering at the Willard Hotel on January 5th, 2021, as part of an effort to persuade Members of Congress to block the certification of the election the next day. Mr. Bannon is also quoted as stating, on January 5th, that ‘[a]ll Hell is going to break loose tomorrow.’

Lyndon Brentnall. Ellipse rally; deposition scheduled for Oct. 22. Brentnall provided security staff for the rally at the Ellipse.

Committee description:

Lyndon Brentnall, of RMS Protective Services, listed on permit paperwork for the January 6th rally as ‘On-Site Supervisor.’

Justin Caporale. Ellipse rally; deposition scheduled for Oct. 25. Caporale worked on first lady Melania Trump’s staff in the White House and on Trump’s campaign before joining an outside events company.

Committee description:

Justin Caporale, of Event Strategies, Inc., listed on permit paperwork for the January 6th rally as ‘Project Manager.’

Cynthia Chafian. Ellipse rally; deposition scheduled for Oct. 28. Chafian is a conservative activist who worked with the group Women for America First (WFAF). WFAF is an offshoot of Women for Trump. Chafian later complained about being sidelined in the days leading up to the Jan. 6 event.

Committee description:

Cynthia Chafian, submitted the first permit application on behalf of WFAF for the January 6th rally, and founder of the Eighty Percent Coalition.

Jeffrey Clark. Clark; deposition scheduled for Oct. 29. Clark was at the center of one of Trump’s most complicated efforts to undermine the results of the 2020 election. Frustrated that the Justice Department wasn’t claiming that rampant fraud had occurred — since it hadn’t — Trump weighed firing the acting attorney general and replacing him with Clark, who had embraced Trump’s false claims about fraud. Ultimately, that didn’t happen.

Committee description:

According to a report released ... by the Senate Committee on the Judiciary, there is credible evidence that, while serving as an official at the Department of Justice, Mr. Clark was involved in efforts to interrupt the peaceful transfer of power. Mr. Clark proposed delivery of a letter to state legislators in Georgia and others encouraging to delay certification of election results. Moreover, he recommended holding a press conference announcing that the Department was investigating allegations of voter fraud despite the lack of evidence that such fraud was present. Both proposals were rejected by Department senior leadership for lacking a factual basis and being inconsistent with the Department’s institutional role.

John Eastman. Campaign; deposition scheduled for Dec. 8. Eastman was the author of what has been called the “coup memo,” a legal document arguing that Vice President Mike Pence could simply ignore submitted electoral-vote tallies on Jan. 6. Eastman spoke at the rally on the Ellipse on Jan. 6.

Committee description:

John Eastman reportedly advised President Trump and others that Vice President Pence could reject electors from certain states in order to deny Joe Biden a majority of the Electoral College vote. In the days before January 6th, Mr. Eastman is reported to have participated in a briefing for nearly 300 state legislators regarding purported election fraud, during which he told the group that it was ‘the duty of the legislatures to fix this, this egregious conduct, and make sure that we’re not putting in the White House some guy that didn’t get elected.’ Mr. Eastman reportedly participated in the January 5th, 2021 meeting at the Willard Hotel in Washington, D.C. and he spoke at the rally on the Ellipse on January 6th prior to the attack on the U.S. Capitol.

Michael Flynn. Campaign; deposition scheduled for Dec. 6. Flynn served as Trump’s first national security adviser. After leaving the White House early in 2017 (having misrepresented his conversations with a Russian official), Flynn embraced the world of conspiracy theories that surrounded Trump’s presidency.

Committee description:

Michael Flynn reportedly attended a December 18th, 2020 meeting in the Oval Office during which participants discussed seizing voting machines, declaring a national emergency, invoking certain national security emergency powers, and continuing to spread the false message that the November 2020 election had been tainted by widespread fraud. The day before, Flynn gave an interview on Newsmax TV during which he talked about seizing voting machines, foreign influence in the election, and the purported precedent for deploying military troops and declaring martial law to ‘rerun’ the election.

Cassidy Hutchinson. White House; deposition scheduled for Dec. 1. Hutchinson is a former White House official.

Committee description:

Cassidy Hutchinson, who served as Special Assistant to the President for Legislative Affairs, reportedly was at the White House on January 6th and was with the former President when he spoke at the 'Stop the Steal’ rally that day. She also reportedly reached out directly via email and phone to Georgia Deputy Secretary of State Jordan Fuchs relating to a trip to Georgia by White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows to attend an election audit.

Keith Kellogg. White House; deposition scheduled for Dec. 1. Kellogg replaced Flynn on a temporary basis before shifting over to Pence’s staff. On Jan. 6, he reportedly told Trump to speak out against the violence: “Once mobs get moving, you can’t turn them off. Once they start rolling, it’s hard to bring it under control. But you’ve got to get on top of this and say something.”

Committee description:

Keith Kellogg, who served as Vice President Pence’s National Security Advisor, reportedly participated in at least one January 2021 meeting with the former President and Pat Cipollone during which the former President insisted that former Vice President Pence not certify the election. He was reportedly in the White House with the former President as he watched the January 6th attack unfold and has direct information about the former President’s statements about and reaction to the insurrection. During that day, it is reported that Lt. Gen. Kellogg met with the former President and others before the rally at the Ellipse and then, after the rally, he urged the former President to send out a tweet to his supporters at the U.S. Capitol to help control the crowd.

Bernard Kerik. Campaign; deposition scheduled for Dec. 3. Kerik is a longtime ally of Trump attorney Rudolph W. Giuliani. He was also pardoned by Trump after pleading guilty to (and serving time for) fraud.

Committee description:

Bernard Kerik reportedly participated in the January 5th, 2021 meeting at the Willard Hotel in Washington, D.C. Mr. Kerik reportedly paid for rooms and suites in Washington, D.C. hotels that served as election-related command centers, and also worked with Mr. Rudolph Giuliani to investigate allegations of voter fraud and promote baseless litigation and ‘Stop the Steal’ efforts.

Kenneth Klukowski. White House; deposition scheduled for Nov. 29. Klukowski is a former White House official who had earlier worked with conservative organizations and associations.

Committee description:

Kenneth Klukowski, former Senior Counsel to Assistant Attorney General Jeffrey Clark, was involved in drafting a letter that urged legislatures in certain states to delay certification of the election, according to the report recently released by the Senate Committee on the Judiciary. The report also states that Mr. Clark contacted Mr. Klukowski to prepare for an Oval Office meeting with the former President that took place on January 3rd, 2021.

Amy Kremer. Ellipse rally; deposition scheduled for Oct. 29. Kremer is a former tea party activist and failed congressional candidate who founded WFAF, the group that organized the rally on the Ellipse on Jan. 6. She is the mother of Kylie Kremer.

Committee description:

Amy Kremer, founder and Chair of WFAF.

Kylie Kremer. Ellipse rally; deposition scheduled for Oct. 29. Kremer is a co-founder of WFAF with her mother, Amy. The two helped organize the rally at the Ellipse on Jan. 6, eventually folding in the rally slated for the Capitol during the counting of electoral votes.

Committee description:

Kylie Kremer, founder and Executive Director of WFAF.

Christopher Liddell. White House; deposition scheduled for Nov. 30. A former business executive, Liddell joined the White House in 2018.

Committee description:

Christopher Liddell, former White House Deputy Chief of Staff, was in the White House on January 6th and reportedly considered resigning on that day but stayed on ‘after a great deal of persuasion.’

Nicholas Luna. White House; deposition scheduled for Dec. 6. Luna was a close aide to Trump who is apparently of interest to the committee mostly because of that proximity.

Committee description:

Nicholas Luna, who served as the former President’s personal assistant, was reportedly in the Oval Office the morning of January 6th, 2021, when the former President was on a phone call to Vice President Pence pressuring him not to certify the results of the 2020 presidential election.

Nathan Martin. Hill rally; deposition scheduled for Oct. 28. A city official from Ohio, Martin worked with Alexander’s “Stop the Steal” organization, including apparently helping to set up the rally scheduled for Capitol Hill on Jan. 6 — allegedly using a false name for the organization.

Committee description:

According to documents provided to the Select Committee, an organization named ‘One Nation Under God’ submitted a permit application in December 2020 to the U.S. Capitol Police for a rally about ‘the election fraud in the swing states’ to be held on the U.S. Capitol Grounds on January 6th, 2021. Nathan Martin’s phone number and email address were listed among the contact information for ‘One Nation Under God.’ A vendor who was also listed on the permit application informed Capitol Police that he was reporting to Ali Alexander and Mr. Martin and identified them both as being affiliated with Stop the Steal. On two of its websites, Stop the Steal advertised the Capitol rally event and sought donations to offset expenses for January 6th. ... However, the permit application did not disclose any connection between Stop the Steal and the Capitol rally event. Further, when a Capitol Police official spoke with Mr. Martin at the end of December 2020, Mr. Martin claimed not to have any information about the rally and directed the official to speak with the vendor. According to the police official, the vendor was ‘shocked’ to learn this because he was in ‘daily communication’ with Mr. Martin about the event.

Angela McCallum. Campaign; deposition scheduled for Nov. 30. McCallum is a former White House official.

Committee description:

Angela McCallum, national executive assistant to former President Trump’s 2020 re-election campaign, reportedly participated in efforts to spread false information about alleged voter fraud in the November 2020 election and to encourage state legislatures to alter the outcome of the November 2020 election. Specifically, there is a publicly available recording of a voicemail that Ms. McCallum reportedly left for an unknown Michigan state representative. In the recording, Ms. McCallum wanted to know whether the Trump campaign could ‘count on’ the representative and said that the individual had the authority to appoint an alternate slate of electors based on purported evidence of widespread election fraud.

Kayleigh McEnany. White House; deposition scheduled for Dec. 3. McEnany is a cable news pundit turned White House press secretary. On the same day that she was subpoenaed by the committee, she was identified by the Office of Special Counsel as having violated the Hatch Act, illegally campaigning while serving in Trump’s White House.

Committee description:

Kayleigh McEnany, former White House Press Secretary, made multiple public statements from the White House and elsewhere about purported fraud in the November 2020 election. For example, in the first White House press conference after the election, Ms. McEnany claimed that there were ‘very real claims’ of fraud that the former President’s reelection campaign was pursuing, and said that mail-in voting was something that ‘we have identified as being particularly prone to fraud.’ At another press conference, Ms. McEnany accused Democrats of ‘welcoming fraud’ and ‘welcoming illegal voting.’ In addition, Ms. McEnany was reportedly present at times with the former President as he watched the January 6th attack.

John McEntee. White House; deposition scheduled for Dec. 15. McEntee at one point served as Trump’s body man, the role later played by Luna. After being ousted from the administration because of questions about his gambling habit, he returned and was put in charge of personnel decisions. In a lengthy report on McEntee for the Atlantic, ABC News’s Jonathan Karl describes him as “the man who made Jan. 6 possible.”

Committee description:

John McEntee, former White House Personnel Director, was reportedly present in the Oval Office when Rudolph Giuliani, Justin Clark, the former President, and former Vice President Pence discussed the audit process in Georgia and listened as Mr. Giuliani suggested seizing Dominion voting machines because of alleged fraud. Mr. McEntee was also reportedly involved in communications with officials in various federal agencies regarding loyalty to President Trump and specifically discouraged a number of individuals from seeking employment after the election as it would appear to be a concession of President Trump’s defeat. In addition, according to reports, Mr. McEntee was in the White House on January 6th and was with former President Trump when he traveled to the Ellipse and spoke at the 'Stop the Steal’ rally.

Mark Meadows. Senior team; deposition scheduled for Oct. 15. A former member of the House, Meadows served as Trump’s chief of staff for his final months in office.

Committee description:

While serving as White House Chief of Staff, Mark Meadows reportedly communicated with officials at the state level and in the Department of Justice as part of an effort to overturn the results of the 2020 election or prevent the election’s certification. According to other reporting, Mr. Meadows was also in communication with organizers of the January 6 rally, including Amy Kremer of Women for America First. The Select Committee has previously sought White House records dealing with Mr. Meadows, including his actions and communications and information he received dealing with the results and integrity of the 2020 election.

Molly Michael. White House; deposition scheduled for Dec. 2. Michael is a former White House official.

Committee description:

Molly Michael, who served as Special Assistant to the President and Oval Office Operations Coordinator, was involved in sending information about alleged election fraud to various individuals at the direction of President Trump, according to information obtained by the Select Committee.

Jason Miller. Campaign; deposition scheduled for Dec. 10. Jason Miller worked with Trump’s 2016 campaign and was briefly tapped to work on the incoming president’s communications team, before personal issues derailed his ascent. He had a prominent role in Trump’s reelection effort last year.

Committee description:

Jason Miller, a Senior Advisor to former President Trump’s 2020 reelection campaign, spread the false claim that the November 2020 had been tainted by widespread fraud. Even before the election, Mr. Miller publicly claimed that Democrats would ‘steal’ the election, a message that individuals who attacked the U.S. Capitol echoed on January 6th. After the election, Mr. Miller coordinated with Mr. Trump and Rudolph Giuliani, and claimed in public press events that the election was rigged. Additionally, according to public reports, Mr. Miller participated in a meeting on January 5th, 2021 at the Willard Hotel in Washington, D.C., in which Mr. Giuliani, Stephen Bannon, and others discussed options for overturning the results of the November 2020 election by, among other things, pressuring Vice President Pence to not certify the electoral college results.

Stephen Miller. White House; deposition scheduled for Dec. 14. Miller was a member of Trump’s original political team, joining his 2016 campaign from the office of then-Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.). In the White House, he served in an advisory role largely focused on immigration.

Committee description:

Stephen Miller, who served as Senior Advisor to the former President, by his own account participated in efforts to spread false information about alleged voter fraud in the November 2020 election, as well as efforts to encourage state legislatures to alter the outcome of the November 2020 election by appointing alternate slates of electors.

Maggie Mulvaney. Ellipse rally; deposition scheduled for Oct. 26. Mulvaney is the niece of former Trump acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney. She also worked on Trump’s 2020 reelection team.

Committee description:

Maggie Mulvaney, listed on permit paperwork for the January 6th rally as ‘VIP Lead.’

Kashyap Patel. Senior team; deposition scheduled for Oct. 14. Kash Patel came to the administration from the staff of Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.). (You may remember the kerfuffle over a secret memo about the Russia probe in early 2018; that memo was written by Patel.) Patel was part of an unusual shuffle of staff at the Defense Department after Trump’s election loss.

Committee description:

At the time of the January 6th attack, Kashyap Patel was serving as chief of staff to Acting Secretary of Defense Christopher Miller. The former President had appointed Mr. Patel to this position on November 10, the day after then-Secretary of Defense Mark Esper was replaced. According to documents provided by the Defense Department and published accounts, Mr. Patel was involved with discussions among senior Pentagon officials prior to and on January 6th, 2021, regarding security at the Capitol, and told a reporter that he was talking to Mr. Meadows ‘nonstop that day.’ The Select Committee has previously sought information about steps taken at the Pentagon to protect the national security both before and after January 6th, including Mr. Patel’s role and his communications with other Pentagon officials.

Katrina Pierson. Ellipse rally; deposition scheduled for Nov. 3. Pierson was a longtime Trump aide who worked on his 2016 campaign. She was reportedly instrumental in setting up the Jan. 5 rally, at which Trump allies from further on the fringe (like Alex Jones and Ali Alexander) spoke.

Committee description:

Katrina Pierson, former Trump campaign official, reportedly involved in the organization of the January 5th and 6th rallies and was in direct communication with the former President about the rallies.

Megan Powers. Ellipse rally; deposition scheduled for Oct. 21. A consultant who worked with WFAF on the rally at the Ellipse.

Committee description:

Megan Powers, of MPowers Consulting LLC, listed on permit paperwork for the January 6th rally as ‘Operations Manager for Scheduling and Guidance.’

Hannah Salem. Ellipse rally; deposition scheduled for Oct. 22. Salem is another former White House staffer who joined the private sector before being looped back into the Jan. 6 rally.

Committee description:

Hannah Salem, of Salem Strategies LLC, listed on permit paperwork for the January 6th rally as ‘Operations Manager for Logistics and Communications.’

Daniel Scavino. Senior team; deposition scheduled for Oct. 15. Scavino is one of the original players in Trump’s political world, serving since the 2016 campaign as a social media adviser. During Trump’s presidency, he would often tweet on Trump’s behalf.

Committee description:

Reporting indicates that former White House Deputy Chief of Staff for Communications Daniel Scavino was with the former President on January 5th during a discussion of how to convince Members of Congress not to certify the election for Joe Biden. Prior to the January 6th March for Trump, Mr. Scavino promoted the event on Twitter, encouraging people to ‘be a part of history.’ And records indicate that Mr. Scavino was tweeting messages from the White House on January 6, 2021.

William Stepien. Campaign; deposition scheduled for Dec. 13. Before joining Trump’s reelection campaign, Stepien was best known for having served in the administration of former New Jersey governor Chris Christie — and having been caught up in what became known as “Bridgegate,” the scandal surrounding the closing of lanes entering the George Washington Bridge to punish a political opponent of Christie’s. When longtime Trump campaign aide Brad Parscale was ousted over the summer, Stepien replaced him.

Committee description:

William Stepien served as manager of the Trump 2020 reelection campaign. The campaign reportedly urged state and party officials to affect the outcome of the November 2020 election by asking states to delay or deny certification of electoral votes and by sending multiple slate of electoral votes to the United States Congress.

Tim Unes. Ellipse rally; deposition scheduled for Oct. 25. Unes is a former Trump campaign staffer who now works with Caporale at an outside events firm.

Committee description:

Tim Unes, of Event Strategies, Inc., listed on permit paperwork for the January 6th rally as ‘Stage Manager.’

Benjamin Williamson. White House; deposition scheduled for Dec. 2. Williamson is a former White House staffer.

Committee description:

Benjamin Williamson, who served as Deputy Assistant to the President and Senior Advisor to Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, was reportedly contacted by a former White House official during the attack on the U.S. Capitol who urged him and Mr. Meadows, without success, to have the former President issue a statement addressing the attack and condemning the violence.

Caroline Wren. Ellipse rally; deposition scheduled for Oct. 26. A prominent fundraising consultant for the Trump campaign and the GOP, Wren had a central role in planning the Jan. 6 rally, according to reporting from ProPublica.

Committee description:

Caroline Wren, listed on permit paperwork for the January 6th rally as ‘VIP Advisor.’
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