The Washington PostDemocracy Dies in Darkness

Poll shows voters evenly split as candidates press ahead on final weekend of rallies

Supporters watch as Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) speaks at a “Unite and Win” rally in Clearwater, Fla., on Saturday. (Thomas Simonetti for The Washington Post)

President Biden was in Sarah Lawrence College on Sunday to campaign with New York Gov. Kathy Hochul (D) as she fends off a fierce Republican challenge for reelection. Democrats are fighting to keep their majorities in the House and the Senate even as polls show Republicans hold significant advantages on issues voters are most concerned about going into the Tuesday midterm elections.

Meanwhile, former president Donald Trump and Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) held separate rallies in Florida on Sunday, highlighting the tension between the two potential 2024 Republican presidential rivals.

Trump campaigned in Miami with Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), who is fending off a challenge for his seat from Rep. Val Demings (D-Fla.). DeSantis held events in three Florida cities on Sunday, ostensibly for his reelection campaign as governor, though he has dodged questions about his presidential ambitions.

What to know

  • According to a Washington Post-ABC News poll, voters’ intentions for the House are split about evenly, with 49 percent of registered voters saying they will vote for the Republican candidate in their district and 48 percent saying they will vote for the Democrat. Likely voters split 50 percent Republican and 48 percent Democratic.
  • Former president Bill Clinton joined Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nev.) in Nevada on Sunday at the urging of Senate Majority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.). Clinton has become a popular Democratic surrogate on the campaign trail this year.
  • Are you ready to vote? Answer a few questions, and we will build a personalized tool kit with stories, explainers and graphics on why the midterms matter, how the election will affect issues you care about and more.
Press Enter to skip to end of carousel

Here's what to know:

According to a Washington Post-ABC News poll, voters’ intentions for the House are split about evenly, with 49 percent of registered voters saying they will vote for the Republican candidate in their district and 48 percent saying they will vote for the Democrat. Likely voters split 50 percent Republican and 48 percent Democratic.
Former president Bill Clinton joined Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nev.) in Nevada on Sunday at the urging of Senate Majority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.). Clinton has become a popular Democratic surrogate on the campaign trail this year.
Are you ready to vote? Answer a few questions, and we will build a personalized tool kit with stories, explainers and graphics on why the midterms matter, how the election will affect issues you care about and more.

1/3

End of carousel

The 2022 Midterm Elections

Georgia runoff election: Sen. Raphael G. Warnock (D) won re-election in the Georgia Senate runoff, defeating Republican challenger Herschel Walker and giving Democrats a 51st seat in the Senate for the 118th Congress. Get live updates here and runoff results by county.

Divided government: Republicans narrowly won back control of the House, while Democrats will keep control of the Senate, creating a split Congress.

What the results mean for 2024: A Republican Party red wave seems to be a ripple after Republicans fell short in the Senate and narrowly won control in the House. Donald Trump announced his 2024 presidential campaign shortly after the midterms. Here are the top 10 2024 presidential candidates for the Republicans and Democrats.

Loading...