Politics


Democrats branded voting rights as one of their top legislative issues – but are almost out of options on getting a voting rights bill, or other legislative priorities, passed under the current Senate filibuster rules.


Among other measures, the Biden administration intends to revoke the licenses of gun sellers who neglect to run required background checks.

Some don’t want the Advance Research Projects Agency for Health to be based inside the National Institutes of Health.

So far, 28 states have passed new laws this year that make it easier to vote, a striking countertrend to restrictions adopted by some GOP-controlled states.


Where Democratic senators stand on changing or eliminating the filibuster

An analysis of the positions where Democratic senators stand on changing or eliminating the filibuster

The big questions on Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse and the allegedly ‘all-White’ beach club

It’s not entirely clear whether the Democratic senator has belonged to an all-White beach club. What is clear is that he has handled questions about it poorly.

The White House sees a political advantage in focusing on gun control as a way to stem the violence.

Ron Klain said every family with kids will get a tax credit, but some on the very high or low ends may be left out.

The conservative figure held a rancher protest against the Bureau of Land Management in Nevada and led an armed takeover of a federal wildlife refuge in Oregon.

Kim Avis began a 15-year sentence for rape and other crimes in Scotland last week — after an investigation in the American West that involved police and the U.S. Marshals Service.

Ranked choice voting is expected to delay the results; former cop Eric Adams and former presidential candidate Andrew Yang led in Democratic polls.

Questions remained about whether the club’s membership is all-White as the senator and the club have declined to provide details.

Sen. Joe Manchin III (D-W.Va.) opposes the bill as it is now, but may still support a procedural step to start debating it.

Democrats and voting rights activists have long decried voter ID rules as thinly veiled tactics to suppress the vote. Now some leading voices are signaling they would accept such requirements as the price of broader voting rights measures.

Many lawmakers and liberal activists insist the fight is not over, but they face long odds as key Democrats remain unwilling to change Senate rules to advance voting legislation.

  • Analysis

The data are sparse, but the outcome probably wouldn't have changed.

  • Analysis

New York City votes, social conservatives bring more Latinos for the party, and Donald Trump returns to New Jersey's airwaves (thanks to Democrats).

Kiran Ahuja will head the Office of Personnel Management with no support from Senate Republicans, who voted against her based on her support for the controversial policy known as critical race theory.

  • Analysis

The rise in Democratic cities is likely a function more of 'city' than 'Democratic'.

Former senator Joe Lieberman and Mayor Muriel E. Bowser stressed voting rights for D.C. residents.

“It’s a long tradition in Rhode Island, and there are many of them,” Whitehouse told a local news outlet when asked whether such clubs should continue to exist.

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