The Washington Post

A shutdown Q&A

Here are answers to a few basic questions about how a spending deal struck Friday night would affect federal workers, tourists and taxpayers.

FEDERAL WORKERS

What does the stopgap funding bill passed Friday night mean for federal employees?

Federal employees are expected to report to work as normal on their next scheduled day, according to the Office of Management and Budget. All government operations will resume at full capacity, according to the OMB.

Agencies have asked employees to stay informed through the news media or to check the Office of Personnel Management’s Web site at www.opm.gov for updates on the government’s operating status.

TOURISTS

Will museums and federal attractions now be open?

President Obama answered this question Friday night as he addressed the nation: “I’m pleased to announce that the Washington Monument, as well as the entire federal government, will be open for business.”

What about public events this weekend?

The Cherry Blossom Kite Festival and performances at the Sylvan Theater on the Washington Monument grounds will go on as scheduled. The National Cherry Blossom Parade will continue as planned, as will the Sakura Matsuri-Japanese Street Festival and the George Washington Parkway Classic.

TAXPAYERS

Could we be back in the same situation, on the verge of a shutdown, six days from now, when the stopgap bill expires?

It’s possible, but that prospect appears unlikely. Congressional aides will use this time to write into legislative language the deal agreed to by House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) and Senate Majority Leader Harry M. Reid (D-Nev.). The bill would then work its way through both houses and, barring any major obstacles along the way, should reach Obama’s desk before Thursday.

— Lyndsey Layton

The Freddie Gray case

Please provide a valid email address.

You’re all set!

Campaign 2016 Email Updates

Please provide a valid email address.

You’re all set!

Get Zika news by email

Please provide a valid email address.

You’re all set!
Comments
Show Comments
The Democrats debated Thursday night. Get caught up on the race.
The Post's Chris Cillizza on the Democratic debate...
On Clinton: She poked a series of holes in Sanders's health-care proposal and broadly cast him as someone who talks a big game but simply can't hope to achieve his goals.

On Sanders: If the challenge was to show that he could be a candidate for people other than those who already love him, he didn't make much progress toward that goal. But he did come across as more well-versed on foreign policy than in debates past.
The PBS debate in 3 minutes
Quoted
We are in vigorous agreement here.
Hillary Clinton, during the PBS Democratic debate, a night in which she and Sanders shared many of the same positions on issues
South Carolina polling averages
Donald Trump leads in the polls as he faces rivals Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz heading into the S.C. GOP primary on Feb. 20.
South Carolina polling averages
The S.C. Democratic primary is Feb. 27. Clinton has a significant lead in the state, whose primary falls one week after the party's Nevada caucuses.
62% 18%
Fact Checker
Trump’s claim that his border wall would cost $8 billion
The billionaire's claim is highly dubious. Based on the costs of the Israeli security barrier (which is mostly fence) and the cost of the relatively simple fence already along the U.S.-Mexico border, an $8 billion price tag is simply not credible.
Pinocchio Pinocchio Pinocchio Pinocchio
The complicated upcoming voting schedule
Feb. 20

Democrats caucus in Nevada; Republicans hold a primary in South Carolina.

Feb. 23

Republicans caucus in Nevada.

Feb. 27

Democrats hold a primary in South Carolina.

Upcoming debates
Feb 13: GOP debate

on CBS News, in South Carolina

Feb. 25: GOP debate

on CNN, in Houston, Texas

March 3: GOP debate

on Fox News, in Detroit, Mich.

Campaign 2016
Where the race stands
Most Read

politics

Success! Check your inbox for details.

See all newsletters

Close video player
Now Playing

To keep reading, please enter your email address.

You’ll also receive from The Washington Post:
  • A free 6-week digital subscription
  • Our daily newsletter in your inbox

Please enter a valid email address

I have read and agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.

Please indicate agreement.

Thank you.

Check your inbox. We’ve sent an email explaining how to set up an account and activate your free digital subscription.