The Senate on Friday rejected a measure to call witnesses in President Trump’s impeachment trial after Republicans argued new testimony is unnecessary, ensuring the trial will be the first in U.S. history without witnesses.

Closing arguments will begin Monday morning, under a resolution adopted by the chamber. Senators plan to vote Wednesday on the two impeachment charges against Trump for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

Democrats had been pushing to call former national security adviser John Bolton and other officials who declined to participate in the House proceedings that led to Trump’s impeachment. But most GOP senators, led by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), rallied to the president’s defense and said he should not be removed from office.

The crux of the case for his impeachment is the allegation that he withheld military aid and a White House meeting to pressure Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden and his son. Hunter Biden served on the board of Burisma, a Ukrainian energy company, while his father was vice president.

●Endangered Republicans go all-in on Trump.

●Republicans agree it was no ‘perfect call’ but will vote to acquit Trump anyway.

●Giuliani made personal ask for a former Ukrainian client during to Zelensky aide while meeting to discuss investigations sought by Trump.

1:40 a.m.
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Sen. Graham: The ‘Rudy element’ could be considered inappropriate

Sen. Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.), who has been one of President Trump’s foremost defenders throughout the four-month impeachment process, acknowledged Friday evening that some of his conduct could be considered inappropriate, though not impeachable.

His comments, to a small group of reporters as he left the Capitol after Friday’s votes, came after Republican Sens. Lamar Alexander (Tenn.), Rob Portman (Ohio) and Marco Rubio (Fla.) cited the inappropriate-but-not-impeachable standard in justifying their votes against calling additional witnesses.

In response to a question from CNN’s Alex Rogers, Graham said that “there was ample reason” for Trump to want Ukraine to investigate the Biden family and claims of Ukrainian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

“But, you know, when it’s somebody who’s an opponent . . . I think that the best thing we could do is — if this ever happens again, who do you call?” he said, suggesting that enlisting personal attorney Rudolph W. Giuliani was not the best choice: “I think that the fault could be that the Rudy element — you could say that was inappropriate, but nowhere near impeachable.”

Speaking generally about the trial, Graham said, “I was hoping it’d be over.”

“But, you know, the Senate’s the Senate,” he added. “It works its will. . . . We’re going to land this plane. We know where we’re going to land it, and hopefully we hit the runway.”

1:00 a.m.
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Senate adopts McConnell resolution, adjourns for weekend

The Senate adopted on a 53-to-47 vote a resolution by McConnell laying out the timetable for the remainder of the trial.

Under the resolution, the Senate will convene at 11 a.m. Monday to hear closing arguments from House impeachment managers and Trump’s lawyers. Votes on the articles of impeachment are scheduled Wednesday at 4 p.m.

In between, senators will have opportunities to given speeches on the Senate floor.

Following the approval of McConnell’s resolution, the Senate adjourned until Monday.

12:50 a.m.
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Senate defeats amendment to require Roberts to rule on witnesses

The Senate defeated on a 53-to-47 vote an amendment by Sen. Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.) that would have required Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. to rule on motions to subpoena witnesses and documents and to rule on any assertion of privilege.

The amendment would have altered rules proposed by McConnell for the remainder of the trial.

The vote broke along party lines.

12:40 a.m.
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Senate defeats another amendment to subpoena Bolton

The Senate defeated on a 51-t0-49 vote another amendment by Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) to subpoena only Bolton.

This one also specified that there would be one day for a deposition and one day for live testimony before the Senate.

The amendment would have altered rules proposed by McConnell for the remainder of the trial.

The vote largely broke along party lines, with Sens. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) and Susan Collins (R-Maine) siding with the Democrats.

12:35 a.m.
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Trump signs off on new resolution for acquittal vote, official says

McConnell telephoned the president before formally introducing a fresh resolution that lays out a timetable for his acquittal vote, according to an official familiar with the conversation.

The two men discussed the details of the resolution, and the president approved, according to the official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to disclose a private conversation. The resolution calls for a 4 p.m. acquittal vote next Wednesday.

12:30 a.m.
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Senate defeats narrower amendment to subpoena Bolton

The Senate defeated on a 51-to-49 vote a narrower amendment by Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) to subpoena only Bolton.

The amendment would have altered rules proposed by McConnell for the remainder of the trial.

The vote largely broke along party lines, with Sens. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) and Susan Collins (R-Maine) siding with the Democrats.

12:25 a.m.
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Senate defeats amendment to subpoena witnesses, documents

The Senate defeated on a 53-to-47 vote an amendment by Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) to issue subpoenas to four officials, including acting White House chief of staff and Bolton, as well as documents from the Office of Management and Budget, the Department of Defense and State Department relevant to Trump’s conduct toward Ukraine.

The amendment would have altered rules proposed by McConnell for the remainder of the trial.

The vote broke along party lines.

12:20 a.m.
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Chief justice says he does not have general authority to break ties

In an inquiry to Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) asked Roberts if he was aware that Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase broke two ties during the 1868 impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson.

“I am, Mr. Leader,” Robert replied. “One concerned a motion to adjourn, the other concerned a motion to close deliberations. I do not regard those isolated episodes 150 years ago as sufficient to support a general authority to break ties. If the members of this body, elected by the people and accountable to them, divide equally on a motion, the normal rules is that the motion fails.”

He added: “I think it would be inappropriate for me, an unelected official from a different branch of government, to assert the power to change that result so that the motion would succeed.”

Democrats had previously urged Roberts to weigh in if there was a tie vote over calling witnesses. But the motion for witnesses failed Friday evening by a vote of 51 to 49.

12:10 a.m.
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Pelosi calls Senate Republicans ‘accomplices to the President’s cover-up’

In a blistering statement, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said Republican senators who voted against witnesses and documents are “accomplices to the President’s cover-up.”

“The President was impeached for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress,” Pelosi said. “He is impeached forever. There can be no acquittal without a trial. And there is no trial without witnesses, documents and evidence.”

She called it “a sad day for America to see Senator McConnell require the Chief Justice of the United States to preside over a vote which rejected our nation’s judicial norms, precedents and institutions to uphold the Constitution and the rule of law.”

12:00 a.m.
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House managers say senators who voted against witnesses ‘set a dangerous precedent’

Following the Senate vote, the House impeachment managers said senators who voted against witnesses “set a dangerous precedent.”

“The truth cannot be denied, not for long, and the facts will continue to come out as they did today,” the seven Democratic managers said in a statement. “Senators who opposed hearing from these witnesses, when their testimony would have better informed a judgment on the guilt or innocence of the President, will be hard pressed to explain why. Senators chose instead to set a dangerous precedent that will have long-lasting repercussions for the United States Congress, the balance of powers, and our democracy as a whole.”

11:30 p.m.
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American Conservative Union disinvites Mitt Romney from annual conference

Matt Schlapp, chairman of the American Conservative Union, tweeted Friday that Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) was disinvited from the annual Conservative Political Action Conference, known as CPAC.

“BREAKING: The ‘extreme conservative’ and Junior Senator from the great state of Utah, @SenatorRomney is formally NOT invited to #CPAC2020,” Schlapp tweeted.

The decision was announced after Romney, who was the Republican presidential nominee in 2012, aligned with Senate Democrats Friday with a “yes” vote for additional witnesses in the impeachment trial of President Trump.

Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine), who also voted for witnesses, was not the subject of a similar tweet from Schlapp.

CPAC, described as the “largest and most influential gathering of conservatives in the world,” launched in 1974. CPAC 2020 will take place at the National Harbor in Prince George’s County, Md., starting Feb. 26.

In a tweet late Friday, Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah) voiced his support for Romney, calling him “a great friend and an excellent Senator.”

“We have disagreed about a lot in this trial,” Lee wrote. “But he has my respect for the thoughtfulness, integrity, and guts he has shown throughout this process. Utah and the Senate are lucky to have him.”

11:20 p.m.
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Senate plans Wednesday votes on two impeachment charges

Senators plan to vote Wednesday at 4 p.m. on the two impeachment charges against Trump for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. Republican officials said late Friday that closing arguments will be held early next week ahead of the votes.

The final votes will come after both the Iowa caucuses and Trump’s State of the Union address.

“The president is gratified that finally at long last after multiple delays the Senate will set a schedule for his acquittal next week,” said Eric Ueland, Trump’s legislative affairs director. “We do not believe the schedule interferes with his ability to deliver a strong and confident State of the Union message next week in the House of Representatives to the country.”

11:15 p.m.
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Some Republicans agree it was no ‘perfect call’ — but will vote to acquit Trump anyway

It was not a perfect phone call.

That was the message to Trump from a range of Republican senators on Friday — even as they voted to block witnesses from the Senate impeachment trial and signaled they would vote to acquit him on charges that he sought to tie foreign aid to Ukraine launching an investigation into a political foe.

In sparing the president a continued spectacle, the senators pointedly offered the defense that many GOP senators wished to make all along: That Trump’s actions, while odious, were not deserving of the political death penalty.

As more revelations from former national security adviser Bolton’s book flowed, senators shrugged. They knew what he’d done, they said. It was not great, they added, but not that bad. They were ready to move on.

Read more here.

11:10 p.m.
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Hillary Clinton says Republicans put Trump’s interests over the American people

In a tweet after the vote on witnesses, Hillary Clinton slammed Republican senators for “making the American president accountable to no one.”

She also called on voters to remove them.

“Republican senators have put the interests of one president over the interests of all Americans,” she tweeted. “The only remedy now is for us all to vote in overwhelming numbers to replace them — and him — in November.”