Former U.S. secretary of state Madeleine Albright participates in a moderated conversation about her new book, “Fascism: A Warning,” at Georgetown University in April. (Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post)

Former secretary of state Madeleine Albright characterized President Trump on Sunday as “the most undemocratic president in modern American history” but stopped short of labeling him a fascist during a television show broadcast from London.

Albright, who served during the administration of President Bill Clinton, appeared on the BBC’s “Andrew Marr Show,” where she was asked about her book “Fascism: A Warning” and whether she considers Trump to be a fascist.

“I do not think he is a fascist,” Albright said. “I do think he is the most undemocratic president in modern American history, and that troubles me.”

“And by the way, it’s not easy as a former diplomat to be in a foreign country and criticize one’s own president,” Albright added. “But I am concerned.”

Albright, who noted that she was born in Czechoslovakia two years before German dictator Adolf Hitler took over the country, said she wrote her book as a warning about various “things that are happening, not only in the United States but around the world.”

“Fascism is hard to define, by the way,” she told Marr, “but a fascist leader is somebody who identifies himself with one group, tribal of some kind, in order to really isolate and insulate the people that are disagreed with. Ultimately a fascist leader is somebody who uses violence to achieve what he wants.”

“So I do not think that Trump is a fascist leader,” Albright continued, “but I think his attitude towards freedom of speech and the role of the media and his disregard for institutions worries me.”