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Montana Democrats choose a new Senate candidate


Montana state legislator Amanda Curtis fills out paperwork in Helena, Mont., on Saturday after being selected as the replacement candidate for the U.S. Senate race against Republican Rep. Steve Daines. (Thom Bridge/Associated Press)

Montana Democrats on Saturday chose a little-known state lawmaker named Amanda Curtis as their candidate for U.S. Senate after Sen. John Walsh dropped out amid plagiarism allegations from his time at the U.S. Army War College.

Curtis, a first-term representative from Butte, now faces the challenge of introducing herself to Montana voters and making her case for them to choose her over a well-known and well-funded Republican, Rep. Steve Daines, with less than three months until the Nov. 4 elections.

“If we win here in Montana, outspent and outgunned in a race where we were left for dead, it will send a message to Washington, D.C., that we want change,” Curtis said in a speech before the delegates voted.

Republicans need a net gain of six seats in November to take Senate control, and Montana is a prime target to pick up a seat that has been in Democratic hands for more than a century.

The Senate race was seen as a tough one for Democrats to win even with the incumbent Walsh in the running. Now Daines is expected to have a bigger advantage going against a newcomer who doesn’t have his name recognition or $1.7 million campaign bank account.

In this Feb. 12, 2014, file photo, Sen. John Walsh, D-Mont., enters the Senate chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington. Walsh dropped out of the race for his seat after plagiarism allegations dating to his time at the U.S. Army War College. (J. Scott Applewhite/Associated Press)

But Democratic Party delegates at the Lewis and Clark County Fairgrounds insisted the race is still winnable.

“We need to keep this seat, period,” said Judith Forseth, a delegate from southwestern Montana’s Park County. “I’m not ready to concede.”

Curtis, 34, is a high school math teacher. She emerged as the front-runner earlier in the week after she received the endorsement of Montana’s largest unions and high-profile party leaders said they weren’t interested in running.

On Saturday, she appealed to working-class voters and portrayed Daines as being in the camp of corporations and the wealthy. She said her Senate campaign would focus on issues including campaign finance reform, tax reform, and funding for schools and infrastructure that would create jobs.

“This is the worst job market in a generation, but the stock market is doing just fine. Wall Street is doing great,” Curtis said. “This recovery has not reached the rest of us.”

Daines’s campaign released a statement after the selection that did not mention Curtis by name but said voters in November will have a clear choice between the candidates.

“I respect Montanans’ judgment to decide the path that is best for our state, and remain focused on fighting for positive solutions that protect Montanans from Washington overreach, grow our economy and get our country back on track,” Daines said in the statement.

The vote was 82 votes for Curtis and 46 votes for Wilsall rancher Dirk Adams, a political newcomer who lost the Democratic primary to Walsh on June 3. There were 129 delegates from across the state who attended, but not all voted, said Democratic Party spokesman Bryan Watt.

The convention, organized hastily to beat a Wednesday deadline to submit a new candidate to the Montana secretary of state, was the first of its kind for the party, Watt said.

— Associated Press

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