Former Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams speaks during the National Action Network Convention in New York on Wednesday. (Seth Wenig/AP)

Georgia Democrat Stacey Abrams said Thursday that she wants to make a decision this month about running for a U.S. Senate seat from her home state and thinks she could hold off on making a decision about running for president until this fall.

Abrams, who narrowly lost her race for Georgia governor last year, has been publicly mulling her options for next year.

“My first responsibility is to decide whether a Senate run is right for me,” Abrams said during an appearance Thursday on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe,” adding that she is trying to determine if the Senate is “the right job that I need to hold.”

Abrams is being heavily courted by Senate Democratic leaders to challenge Sen. David Perdue (R-Ga.) next year.

If she forgoes the Senate race, Abrams said she thinks she could wait until September to enter the race for the White House.

That timeline is at odds with others in the crowded and still-growing Democratic field. Already 16 candidates are out on the trail, introducing themselves to voters, and raising money in hopes of becoming the Democrat who takes on President Trump next year.

Abrams said if she runs for president, it will not be a “vanity exercise” and she will not aim to wind up as another candidate’s vice presidential running mate.

She denied reports that Joe Biden has talked to her about being his running mate, saying she and the former vice president have had multiple “broad conversations” but not discussed becoming a ticket.

As she weighs her next step, Abrams has managed to remain visible, in part because of an ongoing book tour.

She appeared Wednesday night on “The Late Show” with Stephen Colbert. Asked if there was “any news you would like to make” about running for president, Abrams demurred.

“There is absolutely no news I would like to make this evening,” she said.