Chasing Cancer
On November 13, The Washington Post brought together scientists, doctors, health-care innovators, patients and policymakers for “Chasing Cancer,” a live news event where experts will discuss the latest advances in cancer detection and treatment and examine how the health-care system in the United States is being shaped by a disease that touches the lives of millions.
Killing Cancer: Creating Cutting-Edge Treatments
A discussion about the latest advances and challenges in the field of oncology today, including precision medicine, immunotherapy and other innovative drugs.
Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration Dr. Scott Gottlieb and director of the National Cancer Institute Dr. Norman E. “Ned” Sharpless, discuss the latest advances and challenges in the field of oncology, including precision medicine, immunotherapy and other innovative drugs.
  • Nov 13
At a Washington Post Live event, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb and NCI Director Ned Sharpless discussed the great promises and challenges of precision medicine treatment models in oncology.
  • Nov 13
At a Washington Post Live event, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb talked about the challenge and intense scrutiny over prescribing opioids for cancer pain in the midst of a national addiction epidemic.
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FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb discusses e-cigarette restrictions for underage consumers.
  • Nov 13
Scott Gottlieb, MD
Commissioner, U.S. Food and Drug Administration
Dr. Scott Gottlieb was sworn in as the 23rd Commissioner of Food and Drugs on May 11, 2017. Dr. Gottlieb is a physician, medical policy expert, and public health advocate who previously served as the FDA's Deputy Commissioner for Medical and Scientific Affairs and before that, as a senior advisor to the FDA Commissioner. He also worked on implementation of the Medicare drug benefit as a senior adviser to the Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, where he supported policy work on quality improvement and the agency’s coverage process, particularly as it related to new medical technologies.
Norman “Ned” Sharpless, MD
Director, National Cancer Institute
Norman E. “Ned” Sharpless, MD, was officially sworn in as the 15th director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) on October 17, 2017. Prior to his appointment, Dr. Sharpless served as the director of the University of North Carolina (UNC) Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, a position he held since January 2014. In addition to serving as director of NCI, Dr. Sharpless is chief of the Aging Biology and Cancer Section in the National Institute on Aging’s Laboratory of Genetics and Genomics, where he continues his research on the biology of the aging process that promotes the conversion of normal self-renewing cells into dysfunctional cancer cells.
Moderated by Laurie McGinley
Laurie McGinley is a health and medicine reporter at The Washington Post.
A Silent Epidemic: The Rise of HPV-Related Cancers
A look at rising HPV-related cancer rates in the United States and how doctors are looking to treat and eradicate these preventable cancers.
Doctors and medical experts discuss the rising HPV-related cancer rates in the United States and how doctors are looking to treat and eradicate these preventable cancers.
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Leading cancer researchers discuss the rates of HPV vaccinations in the U.S in comparison to other developed nations.
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At a Washington Post Live event, HPV-researchers describe how oncologists and researchers worldwide are working to eradicate HPV-associated cancer.
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Washington Post reporter Steve Hendrix shares his personal cancer story.
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Maura L. Gillison, MD
Professor, Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Maura L. Gillison is a Professor in the Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology in the Division of Cancer Medicine at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Her laboratory focuses on the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in head and neck malignancies. Her work ranges from cohort studies of oral HPV infection to genetic indicators of response to chemoradiotherapy. She is a physician scientist and has made significant contributions to the identification of human papillomavirus as a cause of a distinct subset of head and neck cancer.
Steve Hendrix
Steve Hendrix is a feature writer at The Washington Post. He was diagnosed with stage 4 squamous cell carcinoma in 2015 and has been cancer-free for three years.
Douglas R. Lowy, MD
Deputy Director, National Cancer Institute and Chief of the Laboratory of Cellular Oncology at the NCI Center for Cancer Research
Douglas R. Lowy, MD, is Chief of the Laboratory of Cellular Oncology and, since 2010, has also been the Deputy Director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). From April 2015 until October 2017, he served as the Acting Director of NCI. Dr. Lowy received his medical degree from New York University School of Medicine in 1968, and trained in internal medicine at Stanford University and dermatology at Yale University. He has directed a research laboratory at NCI since 1975, after receiving training as a Research Associate in the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
Akila Viswanathan, MD
Executive Vice Chair, Johns Hopkins Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences
Akila Viswanathan, M.D., M.P.H., is the executive vice chair for Johns Hopkins Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, the director of gynecologic radiation for Johns Hopkins Medicine, and a professor of radiation oncology and molecular radiation sciences for Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Viswanathan sees patients at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center at Sibley Memorial Hospital and Johns Hopkins Hospital. She is board certified in radiation oncology by the American Board of Radiology.
Moderated by Lenny Bernstein
Lenny Bernstein is a health and medicine reporter at The Washington Post.
Prices and Policies: Addressing the Cost of Cancer
An examination of the financial burdens facing cancer patients and their caregivers and how to reduce costs.
Leaders in health policy examine the financial burdens facing cancer patients and their caregivers and discuss how to reduce these demanding costs.
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Cancer experts including Dr. Zeke Emanuel, Dr. Peter Bach of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and Jennifer Bryant of PhRMA, discuss HHS Secretary Alex Azar’s proposal to lower drug prices at a Washington Post Live event.
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Renowned experts talk about the effects of high drug prices on cancer patients at the Washington Post’s third annual ‘Chasing Cancer’ summit.
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Peter B. Bach, MD
Director, Center for Health Policy and Outcomes, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
Peter B. Bach, Director of Memorial Sloan Kettering’s Center for Health Policy and Outcomes, is a physician, epidemiologist, researcher, and respected healthcare policy expert whose work focuses on the cost and value of anticancer drugs. Dr. Bach is leading efforts to increase understanding of the US drug development process and develop new models for drug pricing that include value to patients.
Jennifer Bryant
Senior Vice President for Policy and Research, PhRMA
Jennifer Bryant serves as Senior Vice President, Policy and Research for the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA), the national association representing the country’s leading pharmaceutical research and biotechnology companies. At PhRMA, she oversees development of public policy related to Medicare, Medicaid and health care reform, as well analysis and policy development related to changes in the health care delivery system.
Dr. Ezekiel J. Emanuel
Vice Provost for Global Initiatives and Chair, Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy, University of Pennsylvania
Ezekiel J. Emanuel is Vice Provost for Global Initiatives and chair of the Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy at the University of Pennsylvania. From January 2009 to January 2011, he served as special advisor for health policy to the director of the White House Office of Management and Budget. Since 1997 he was chair of the Department of Bioethics at The Clinical Center of the National Institutes of Health and a breast oncologist.
Moderated by Paige Winfield Cunningham
Paige Winfield Cunningham is a health policy reporter and author of the “Health 202” Newsletter at The Washington Post.
The Plan To End Cancer: One-on-One with Sean Parker
The entrepreneur and philanthropist discusses his $250 million investment in the development of new technologies to combat cancer and examines which fields of research hold the most promise for patients.
Sean Parker, founder and chairman of the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy discusses his $250 million investment in the development of new technologies to combat cancer and examines which fields of research hold the most promise for patients.
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Entrepreneur Sean Parker talks about what he’s learned after a decade of funding cancer research and why he decided to invest in immunotherapy, a form of revolutionary cancer treatment that has recently gained international recognition.
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Internet Entrepreneur Sean Parker talks about the intersection of the health and technology industries and explains why he doesn’t think the next big medical breakthrough will come from tech giants like Google, Apple, and Amazon.
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Sean Parker says he has spoken with key members of the Trump Administration about health policy and how they can do better.
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Entrepreneur and philanthropist Sean Parker discusses government regulation and oversight of social media platforms such as Facebook.
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Entrepreneur and philanthropist Sean Parker tells The Washington Post's Robert Costa what he thinks about the 2020 presidential race.
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Sean Parker
Founder and Chairman, Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy
Sean Parker is a philanthropist and entrepreneur with a record of launching genre-defining companies and organizations. He is the founder and President of the Parker Foundation, which focuses on three areas: Life Sciences, Global Public Health and Civic Engagement. In April 2016, the Parker Foundation announced a $250 million grant to form the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy, which builds on Mr. Parker’s leadership in funding and promoting research into the relationship between the immune system and cancer.
Interviewed by Robert Costa
Robert Costa is a national political reporter at The Washington Post.
Content from AstraZeneca
YOUR Cancer, an initiative of AstraZeneca, spotlights how communities can work together to eliminate cancer as a cause of death. Some of the leading voices of the movement discuss the initiative and talk about how to join.
  • Nov 13
About Washington Post Live
Washington Post Live is the newsroom’s live journalism platform. Top-level government and business leaders, emerging voices and newsmakers discuss the most pressing national and global issues of the day.
    Presenting Sponsor
    AstraZeneca is a science-led biopharmaceutical company, dedicated to partnering with leading scientific companies, organizations and the community to improve outcomes for cancer patients.
    AstraZeneca is a science-led biopharmaceutical company, dedicated to partnering with leading scientific companies, organizations and the community to improve outcomes for cancer patients.
    Supported By
    The precision medicine and multidisciplinary care from Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center experts are available to you throughout the greater Washington DC region.
    The precision medicine and multidisciplinary care from Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center experts are available to you throughout the greater Washington DC region.
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