(Kaz Sasahara for The Washington Post)
(Kaz Sasahara for The Washington Post)
(Kaz Sasahara for The Washington Post)
(Kaz Sasahara for The Washington Post)
(Kaz Sasahara for The Washington Post)
(Kaz Sasahara for The Washington Post)
The Changing Face of America's Veterans
On June 13, The Washington Post explored the dramatically changing demographics of America’s military veterans. Gulf War-era veterans now account for the largest share of all U.S. veterans. In the next 25 years, the number of women and Hispanic veterans will double, while African-American veterans will increase by a third. Is the military changing to address these changing dynamics? The program featured key lawmakers Sen. Martha McSally (R-AZ) and Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI) along with prominent veteran advocates to address the new challenges of taking care of U.S. veterans and examine strategies to keep the nation’s promise to the men and women who have served.
Taking Care of our Warriors: The View from a Candidate
There are a record number of women veterans in Congress, and one of them wants to be the next Commander-in-Chief. We’ll hear from 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii) about her efforts to improve the quality of and access to medical care for all veterans. Gabbard has introduced legislation to allow veterans not being served by the VA to get the immediate care they need from non-VA medical providers.
Highlights
One day after President Trump said he would accept opposition research from foreign powers, 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Rep. Tulsi Gabbard said she ‘strongly disagreed’ with his statement and would report to the FBI any attempts by foreign governments to provide opposition research to her campaign.
  • Jun 13
In response to a question about President Trump deferring service in the Vietnam War, 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Rep. Tulsi Gabbard said, “I personally don’t think highly of those who chose to dodge their service.’
  • Jun 13
When asked by The Washington Post’s Robert Costa about working with Russia to defeat terrorist groups like Al Qaeda and ISIS, 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Rep. Tulsi Gabbard said, ‘I think there is an opportunity to work with others who are concerned with this terrorist threat from groups like al-Qaeda and ISIS...I think we should be working with others.”
  • Jun 13
2020 Democratic presidential candidate Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, who is running on an anti-military intervention foreign policy platform, says that a war with Iran, “would make the war in Iraq look like a cakewalk,” adding that the human cost of such a war would be “immeasurable.”
  • Jun 13
When asked whether she accepts that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad has used chemical weapons, 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Rep. Tulsi Gabbard declined to condemn him suggesting she has yet to assess the evidence saying, “That has been reported. There is also new information coming out from the UN.”
  • Jun 13
Full Segment
Taking Care of our Warriors: The View from a Candidate
There are a record number of women veterans in Congress, and one of them wants to be the next Commander-in-Chief. We’ll hear from 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii) about her efforts to improve the quality of and access to medical care for all veterans. Gabbard has introduced legislation to allow veterans not being served by the VA to get the immediate care they need from non-VA medical providers.
Rep. Tulsi Gabbard
(D-HI), U.S. Army Iraq veteran, 2020 Democratic presidential candidate
Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard is serving her fourth term in the United States House representing Hawaii’s Second District, and serves on the House Armed Services and Financial Services Committees. She previously served on the House Foreign Affairs Committee and Homeland Security Committee. She was elected to the Honolulu City Council in 2010, and prior to that at age 21, was elected to the Hawaii State Legislature in 2002, becoming the youngest person ever elected in the state. Tulsi Gabbard has served in the Hawaii Army National Guard for 16 years, is a veteran of two Middle East deployments, and continues to serve as a Major.
Interviewed by Robert Costa
Washington Post political reporter
Women in Combat: A Senator’s Story
Senator Martha McSally had an impressive military career. She was a U.S. Air Force pilot veteran, and after a 26- year career, rose to the rank of full Colonel. She also revealed in powerful Senate testimony that during her years in the military, she was raped by a superior officer. Now, she wants to do something to help prevent such abuse - Senator McSally recently introduced legislation targeting how armed services tries to prevent assaults, build support for victims, and improve how these cases are investigated and prosecuted. Senator McSally explains, “It’s a moral issue. It’s a readiness issue.”
Highlights
Sen. Martha McSally (R-AZ) says she believes servicemembers who report sexual assaults sometimes face retaliation and isolation because of the amount of time an investigation takes to complete, but she says the military lacks the investigative manpower it needs to proceed in a timely manner. “If we really are committed to solving the issue, we have to put resources toward it.”
  • Jun 13
Earlier this year, Sen. Martha McSally revealed publicly that she was raped by a superior officer during her time in the Air Force. She said she was motivated to share her story because she believed her perspective would lend legitimacy and insight to reforms. ‘This is something that so many women and so many men go through.”
  • Jun 13
Full Segment
Senator Martha McSally had an impressive military career. She was a U.S. Air Force pilot veteran, and after a 26- year career, rose to the rank of full Colonel. She also revealed in powerful Senate testimony that during her years in the military, she was raped by a superior officer. Now, she wants to do something to help prevent such abuse - Senator McSally recently introduced legislation targeting how armed services tries to prevent assaults, build support for victims, and improve how these cases are investigated and prosecuted. Senator McSally explains, “It’s a moral issue. It’s a readiness issue.”
  • Jun 13
Sen. Martha McSally
(R-AZ), former U.S. Air Force combat veteran
Senator Martha McSally represents the people of Arizona in the United States Senate. She previously represented Arizona’s second congressional district for four years in the United States House of Representatives. Prior to serving in Congress, Senator McSally served 26 years in the U.S. Air Force, retiring in 2010 as a full Colonel. She is the first female fighter pilot to fly in combat and first to command a fighter squadron in combat in United States history.
Interviewed by Karen Tumulty
Columnist, The Washington Post
Toxic Exposure: A Looming Crisis
Veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan may have been subjected to a variety of toxic exposures during their service. These can include a host of issues, from diseases related to burn pits, oil well fires and chemical and nerve agent exposure. What is being done, and what more needs to be done, will be addressed by two experts in this nascent field.
Highlights
Military.com Associate Editor Patricia Kime and TAPS President and Founder Bonnie Carroll ‏talk about the profound impact toxic exposure can have on veterans and their families.
  • Jun 13
Full Segment
Veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan may have been subjected to a variety of toxic exposures during their service. These can include a host of issues, from diseases related to burn pits, oil well fires and chemical and nerve agent exposure. What is being done, and what more needs to be done, will be addressed by two experts in this nascent field.
  • Jun 13
Patricia Kime
Associate Editor, Military.com
Patricia Kime has covered military personnel and veterans issues for nearly three decades. As a freelance editor and writer, she currently serves as associate editor at Military.com and previously spent five years as a senior writer at Military Times, covering military health care and medicine. Her work has appeared in The Washington Post, The New York Times, USA Today, Kaiser Health News and other publications. She holds a bachelor’s degree in international relations from the University of Virginia.
Bonnie Carroll
President and Founder, Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS)
Bonnie Carroll is a 2015 recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom. She is a military veteran, the surviving spouse of the Brigadier General Tom Carroll, a former staffer in the Reagan and Bush White Houses, and the President and Founder of the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS), the leading national Military Service Organization providing compassionate care, casework assistance, and 24/7/365 emotional support for all those impacted by the death of a military loved one. Ms. Carroll founded TAPS following the death of her husband in an Army C-12 plane crash on November 12, 1992.
Moderated by Alex Horton
Reporter, The Washington Post
Content from Wounded Warrior Project
Michael Richardson leads Wounded Warrior Project’s (WWP) efforts to heal the invisible wounds of war – post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, and military sexual trauma. WWP has partnered with four world-renowned academic medical centers (Emory Healthcare Veterans Program, Massachusetts General’s Home Base, Rush University’s Road Home, and UCLA’s Operation Mend) to form the Warrior Care Network (WCN) to provide veterans a year’s worth of mental health care during two to three weeks of intensive outpatient therapy. WCN is achieving significant reductions in PTSD and depression and improving veterans’ function and participation in life.
  • Jun 13
Michael Richardson
VP of Independence Services and Mental Health, Wounded Warrior Project
As a WWP vice president, Michael is responsible for all mental health programs including his role as Chairman of the Executive Steering Committee for the Warrior Care Network which is comprised of four leading academic medical centers providing innovative treatment for the invisible wounds. He is also responsible for our Independence Program which provides extensive support to warriors suffering from moderate to severe brain injury, spinal cord injuries or other neurological conditions who are most at risk for being institutionalized. Michael enlisted in the Army in 1981 and retired in 2013 as a Medical Service Corps Lieutenant Colonel.
Full Program
On June 13, The Washington Post explored the dramatically changing demographics of America’s military veterans. In the next 25 years, the number of women and Hispanic veterans will double, while African-American veterans will increase by a third. Is the military changing to address these changing dynamics?
  • 1 day ago
About Washington Post Live
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