Actress Glenn Close and Sens. Roy Blunt and Debbie Stabenow discuss mental heath in the U.S. at a live Washington Post event.
Actress Glenn Close and Sens. Roy Blunt and Debbie Stabenow discuss mental heath in the U.S. at a live Washington Post event.
Actress Glenn Close at Washington Post Live's Mental Health and the Addiction Crisis program
Actress Glenn Close at Washington Post Live's Mental Health and the Addiction Crisis program
Washington Post LIve's Mental Health and the Addiction Crisis program
Washington Post LIve's Mental Health and the Addiction Crisis program
Washington Post LIve's Mental Health and the Addiction Crisis program
Washington Post LIve's Mental Health and the Addiction Crisis program
Washington Post LIve's Mental Health and the Addiction Crisis program
Washington Post LIve's Mental Health and the Addiction Crisis program

Mental Health & the Addiction Crisis

On May 16, The Washington Post brought together Golden Globe award-winning actress and mental health advocate Glenn Close and the sponsors of the Excellence in Mental Health and Addiction Treatment Expansion Act: Sens. Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich) and Roy Blunt (R-Mo), for a conversation about addressing the mental health crisis in America.
One in five adults in the U.S. struggles with a mental illness like depression, bipolar disorder or PTSD. And with the NIH identifying addiction as a mental illness – substance abuse disorder – the national opioid crisis has only increased the burden on mental health providers around the country. Coupled with the stigma attached to the issue, the mental health and addiction crisis translates to a pricey financial burden, lost productivity, out-of-pocket costs for treatment and periods of unemployment.
America’s Mental Health Crisis
Two prominent lawmakers and mental health advocate Glenn Close examine the state of mental health and opioid addiction crisis in the United States and discuss legislation aimed at tackling these issues.

Actress Glenn Close says Hollywood has ‘huge power’ in how the stories of mental illness are told

On the impact of the Netflix series ‘13 Reasons Why’, which is about a teenage girl’s suicide, Actress Glenn Close said, ‘I think it was irresponsible.’ Close said Hollywood has huge power in how the stories of mental illness are told, but she believes as we normalize the issue, there will be a wider variety of characters young people can relate to.
  • May 16, 2019

Sens. Debbie Stabenow, Roy Blunt say mental health bill will lighten load for hospitals, police

Often the responsibility of treating people with mental health issues falls on the shoulders of emergency rooms and law enforcement officials, but Sens. Debbie Stabenow and Roy Blunt say the Excellence in Mental Health and Addiction Treatment Expansion Act will lighten their load. “We’re creating more options than just a trip to the emergency room,” Blunt said.
  • May 16, 2019

Actress Glenn Close says mental health stigmas can affect every aspect of a person’s life

Citing the personal experiences of her sister and nephew, whom both suffer from mental illness, Actress Glenn Close says the stigma associated with mental health issues can affect those who suffer from them everyday. “Everyday they we’re impacted, not only by some behaviors, but also by self stigma because they felt they had been marginalized, they were full of shame, so we decided to do something about it”
  • May 16, 2019

Sens. Debbie Stabenow, Roy Blunt say mental illnesses should be treated like physical illnesses

Sens. Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich) and Roy Blunt (R-Mo), co-sponsors of the Excellence in Mental Health and Addiction Treatment Expansion Act, say mental illnesses should be treated the same way physical illnesses are treated. Their bill would extend funding for certified community behavioral health clinics, allowing greater access to those services.
  • May 16, 2019
Full Segment

America’s Mental Health Crisis

Sens. Debbie Stabenow and Roy Blunt, along with Actress Glenn Close, examine the state of mental health and opioid addiction crisis in the United States and discuss legislation aimed at tackling these issues.
  • May 16, 2019
Glenn Close

Actress; Co-Founder, Bring Change to Mind

Seven-time Academy Award-nominated actress Glenn Close is an acclaimed performer whose work has graced stage, screen, and television. For her most recent film role in The Wife, Close won Golden Globe, SAG, Independent Spirit and Critics Choice Awards as “Best Actress,” as well as nominations from BAFTA, the Gotham Awards, and the London Film Critics, along with that seventh Oscar nomination. In 2010, Glenn Close co-founded Bring Change to Mind, a charity dedicated to confronting, head-on, the stigma associated with mental illness. The organization works to normalize mental health conversations and build the awareness, understanding and empathy necessary to inspire action, structural change, and the creation of new norms which will end stigma and discrimination. The idea for the organization came about following Close’s first-hand observation of battles with mental illness within her family.
Sen. Debbie Stabenow

(D-Michigan)

Debbie Stabenow made history in 2000 when she became the first woman from Michigan elected to the United States Senate. Sen. Stabenow is a national leader in the effort to make sure all people have affordable, quality health care, including mental health care and addiction treatment. As Chair of the Michigan House Mental Health Committee while serving in the Michigan legislature in the 1980s, she led the passage of major legislation to strengthen Michigan’s Mental Health Code, including authoring the Children’s Mental Health Act. In Congress, she authored the mental health parity provisions in the Affordable Care Act. And, in 2014, a version of the Excellence in Mental Health Act she authored with Senator Roy Blunt was signed into law, marking one of the most significant steps forward in community mental health funding in decades. Now, she is partnering with Senator Blunt on legislation to expand the program across the country.
Sen. Roy Blunt

(R-Missouri)

Sen. Roy Blunt was elected to the United States Senate in 2010. Senator Blunt serves as the Chairman of the Senate Republican Policy Committee and as the Chairman of the Senate Rules Committee. He also serves on the Senate Appropriations Committee; the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee; the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence; and the Senate Rules Committee. He is also the Chairman of the Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education.
Moderated by Paige Winfield Cunningham

Health Policy Reporter and Author of The Health 202 Newsletter, The Washington Post

The Fentanyl Failure
Washington Post investigative reporters detail the findings of their series The Fentanyl Failure, examining America’s deadly opioid crisis and the U.S. government’s failure to take adequate measures to curb the epidemic.

Washington Post reporters explain how the fentanyl epidemic began

Synthetic opioids like fentanyl have claimed the lives of more than 67,000 people — more than the number of U.S. military personnel killed during the Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan wars combined. A panel of Washington Post reporters covering ‘The Fentanyl Failure’ explain how the United States found itself in a fentanyl epidemic.
  • May 16, 2019

Washington Post’s Sari Horwitz says Washington failed to address the fentanyl crisis on many levels

Washington Post Justice Department Reporter Sari Horwitz says officials in Washington failed to address the fentanyl epidemic on many levels. “The U.S. Postal Service wasn’t prepared. They didn’t require electronic monitoring of all the packages from China, for example, during those early years. Customs and Border Protection were not prepared. They didn’t have dogs that could detect fentanyl The data coming from the CDC showing deaths was lagging.”
  • May 16, 2019
Full Segment

The Fentanyl Failure

Washington Post investigative reporters detail the findings of their series The Fentanyl Failure, examining America’s deadly opioid crisis and the U.S. government’s failure to take adequate measures to curb the epidemic.
  • May 16, 2019
Sari Horwitz

Justice Department Reporter, The Washington Post

Scott Higham

Investigative Reporter, The Washington Post

Steven Rich

Database Editor, The Washington Post

Moderated by Katie Zezima

National Reporter, The Washington Post

Sponsored Content from Leidos

Sponsored Remarks from Leidos

Jonathan W. Scholl, President of Leido’s Health Group, delivers opening remarks at Washington Post Live’s Mental Health & the Addiction Crisis program.
  • May 16, 2019
Jonathan W. Scholl

President, Health Group

Jonathan W. Scholl currently serves as President of the Health Group and is responsible for leading several thousand employees providing services and solutions in health information technology, population health risk management and case management, health analytics, life sciences, and public health. Prior to joining Leidos in 2015, Scholl served as Chief Strategy Officer for Texas Health Resources (THR), one of the largest non-profit healthcare delivery systems in the country. At THR, Scholl led strategy, business development, strategic marketing, and oversaw operations for physician joint-ventures.
Full Program

Mental Health & the Addiction Crisis

On May 16, The Washington Post brought together Golden Globe award-winning actress and mental health advocate Glenn Close and the sponsors of the Excellence in Mental Health and Addiction Treatment Expansion Act: Sens. Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.) and Roy Blunt (R-Mo), for a conversation about addressing the mental health crisis in America.
  • May 17, 2019
About Washington Post Live
Washington Post Live is the newsroom’s live journalism platform. Top-level government and business leaders, emerging voices and newsmakers discuss the most pressing national and global issues of the day.