Transformers Health
Health care in the U.S. is going through an era of groundbreaking innovation. With the industry’s biggest players prioritizing funding for revolutionary research and initiatives that embrace big and bold ideas, the rapid pace of technological development and advances in medical treatment are challenging traditional care models in transformative ways.
On June 11, The Washington Post Live hosted Transformers: Health featuring health innovators and experts, including Anthony S. Fauci, MD, director, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health; and Scott Gottlieb, MD, former Commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and health venture capital investor. Discussions included the most innovative solutions to today’s top health challenges; the venture capital now focused on the newest innovations in health care, and how technology is revolutionizing patient care.
New York City Health Commissioner Dr. Oxiris Barbot says her agency is doing ‘whatever it takes’ to end the measles outbreak that’s sickened 588 people so far this year. ‘We’re offering people in-home vaccinations...I was telling my staff that I never thought in my public health career that we would be giving immunizations on the down-low.’
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Dr. Nancy Messonnier, acting director of the Center for Preparedness and Response at the CDC, says it’s important that health officials spread accurate information about the measles vaccine and use social media to counter messaging from anti-vaxxers and spread accurate information about the measles vaccine. “When myths and misinformation take hold, it’s hard to stamp them out and it’s hard to counter it.”
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Full Segment
With the measles outbreak top of mind for public health officials in the U.S., we gather key thought leaders in health and medicine to brainstorm innovative solutions to curb what has been declared a measles emergency.
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Nancy Messonnier, MD
Acting Director, Center for Preparedness and Response, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Nancy Messonnier is originally from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and came to CDC through the Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) program. Messonnier oversees NCIRD, which prevents disease, disability, and death through immunization and by control of respiratory diseases. NCIRD implemented the Vaccines for Children Program—a national program that vaccinates about half of the children in the United States each year. From measles to mumps, polio to MERS, whooping cough to Legionnaires’ disease, seasonal flu to pandemic flu, NCIRD handles age-old diseases and emerging ones.
Oxiris Barbot, MD
Health Commissioner, City of New York
Dr. Oxiris Barbot was named New York City’s Health Commissioner last December, becoming the first Latina to lead the agency. With more than 25 years of experience in public health and health care delivery, she has dedicated her career to achieving health equity. Dr. Barbot previously served as medical director for New York City’s schools and Baltimore’s health commissioner from 2010 to 2014, and she was the chief of pediatrics and community medicine at a health clinic in Washington, D.C.
Peter J. Hotez, MD, PhD
Professor and Dean, Baylor College of Medicine
Peter J. Hotez, M.D., Ph.D. is Dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine and Professor of Pediatrics and Molecular Virology & Microbiology at Baylor College of Medicine where he is also the Director of the Texas Children’s Center for Vaccine Development (CVD) and Texas Children’s Hospital Endowed Chair of Tropical Pediatrics. He is also University Professor at Baylor University, and Fellow in Disease and Poverty at the James A Baker III Institute for Public Policy, as well as the Health Policy Scholar in the Baylor Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy.Dr. Hotez is an internationally-recognized physician-scientist in neglected tropical diseases and vaccine development. As head of the Texas Children’s CVD, he leads the only product development partnership for developing new vaccines for hookworm infection, schistosomiasis, leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, and SARS/MERS, diseases affecting hundreds of millions of children and adults worldwide.
Moderated by Lena Sun
Health Reporter, The Washington Post
Augmenting Reality: The Changing Face of Medicine
A spotlight on how 3-D imaging and augmented reality technology were used to perform a groundbreaking total face transplant in 2018. We’ll hear from the lead surgeon and other tech experts about this new frontier of surgical imaging and navigation, and how it will revolutionize how surgeons safely operate on their patients.
Karl West, the director of Medical Solutions at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, says 3-D and holographic technology will change medicine the way X-rays changed medicine.
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Katie Stubblefield was the youngest face transplant recipient in U.S. history. Dr. Brian Gastman, one of Stubblefield’s surgeons at the Cleveland Clinic, describes some of the challenges his team faced.
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Full Segment
A spotlight on how 3-D imaging and augmented reality technology were used to perform a groundbreaking total face transplant in 2018. We’ll hear from the lead surgeon and other tech experts about this new frontier of surgical imaging and navigation, and how it will revolutionize how surgeons safely operate on their patients.
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Brian Gastman, MD
Surgeon, Cleveland Clinic
Dr. Brian Gastman is a plastic surgeon and otolaryngologist at the Cleveland Clinic. He received his medical degree from University of Michigan Medical School and has been in practice for more than 20 years. In 2017, Gastman was the primary plastic surgeon and a member of the face transplant team for Katie Stubblefield. Stubblefield is the youngest person in the U.S. to receive a full face transplant. Gastman also specializes in soft tissue malignancies, like melanoma, non-melanoma skin cancers, sarcomas, and head and neck cancer.
Karl West, M.S.
Director of Medical Device Solutions, Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute
A mechanical engineer by training, Karl has been involved in the design and development of medical devices for over 20 years. He has worked at Cleveland Clinic for more than 17 years in the Department of Biomedical Engineering and is Director of Medical Device Solutions which serves as a bridge between clinical ideas and licensed medical devices. Under his leadership, the interdisciplinary team has developed strong collaborations throughout Cleveland Clinic to promote the development of innovative medical technologies to improve the care of patients. One area of focus is the use augmented reality technologies such as Microsoft Hololens to enhance the accuracy of procedures including face transplant and treatments for liver tumors, ovarian cancer, breast cancer and aortic aneurysms.
Moderated by Katie Zezima
National Correspondent, The Washington Post
Chasing a Cure: The Global Outlook on HIV/AIDS
We showcase the groundbreaking developments in the fight against HIV/AIDS, including how three people were reportedly cured of HIV through stem cell and bone marrow transplants. One of the world’s foremost experts on HIV/AIDS will also talk about the social innovation that has helped to contain the disease globally and the Trump Administration’s goal of eradicating HIV transmission by 2030.
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health, says he believes President Trump’s plan to eradicate HIV in the U.S. in the next decade is possible.
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Stigma, pricing and other barriers can prevent people diagnosed with HIV from getting the medications they need, but Dr. Anthony Fauci, one of the world’s foremost experts on HIV/AIDS, says community-based programming could be the solution.
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Full Segment
We showcase the groundbreaking developments in the fight against HIV/AIDS, including how three people were reportedly cured of HIV through stem cell and bone marrow transplants. One of the world’s foremost experts on HIV/AIDS will also talk about the social innovation that has helped to contain the disease globally and the Trump Administration’s goal of eradicating HIV transmission by 2030.
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Anthony Fauci, MD
Director, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) at the National Institutes of Health
Anthony S. Fauci, MD is a physician-scientist who directs the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. He oversees an extensive research program on infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS, influenza, tuberculosis, Ebola and Zika, as well as diseases of the immune system. Dr. Fauci also serves as one of the key advisors to the White House and Department of Health and Human Services on global infectious disease issues. . Dr. Fauci also is the long-time chief of the NIAID Laboratory of Immunoregulation where he has made numerous important discoveries related to HIV/AIDS and is one of the most-cited scientists in the field.
Lenny Bernstein
Health and Medicine Reporter, The Washington Post
America’s Health Care Future
The former FDA Commissioner talks about his new focus on healthcare entrepreneurship, innovation, and access. With his experience regarding the FDA’s drug and medical device review programs, the opioid crisis, and electronic cigarettes, Dr. Gottlieb will offer his assessment of the current state of public health in the U.S. and discuss what cutting-edge health innovations are on the horizon.
Responding to a Washington Post report that alleged Pfizer didn’t share data about an arthritis drug that appeared to reduce the risk of getting Alzheimer’s disease, former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb said you have to look at the underlying dataset to draw a conclusion. “I have a hard time believing that someone stumbled upon a cure for Alzheimer’s and didn’t try to follow it up.”
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Former FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb says government officials have to recognize the rapidly evolving nature of the opioid crisis. ‘We’ve been guilty for a very long time of always fighting the last fight and being slow to recognize how these things are evolving.’
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Full Segment
The former FDA Commissioner talks about his new focus on healthcare entrepreneurship, innovation, and access. With his experience regarding the FDA’s drug and medical device review programs, the opioid crisis, and electronic cigarettes, Dr. Gottlieb will offer his assessment of the current state of public health in the U.S. and discuss what cutting-edge health innovations are on the horizon.
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Scott Gottlieb, MD
Former Commissioner of Food and Drugs, Food and Drugs Administration
Dr. Scott Gottlieb served as the 23rd Commissioner of Food and Drugs on May 11, 2017 to April 5, 2019. Dr. Gottlieb is a physician, medical policy expert, and public health advocate who previously served as the FDA's Deputy Commissioner for Medical and Scientific Affairs and before that, as a senior advisor to the FDA Commissioner. He also worked on implementation of the Medicare drug benefit as a senior advisor to the Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, where he supported policy work on quality improvement and the agency’s coverage process, particularly as it related to new medical technologies.
Interviewed by Colby Itkowitz
Politics Reporter, The Washington Post
Sponsored Content from Pfizer
Bringing Clinical Trials Into the 21st Century
While medical research is advancing quickly, the development process for medicine hasn’t changed much since the 1960s – until now. As new digital technologies and data sciences converge with a growingly active and connected network of “citizen scientists,” clinical trials are becoming more innovative, efficient, flexible, and inclusive to meet the needs of today’s – and tomorrow’s – patients.
While medical research is advancing quickly, the medicines development process hasn’t changed much since the 1960s – until now. As new digital technologies and data sciences converge with a growingly active and connected network of “citizen scientists,” clinical trials are becoming more innovative, efficient, flexible, and inclusive to meet the needs of today’s – and tomorrow’s – patients.
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Rod MacKenzie, PhD
Executive Vice President, Chief Development Officer, Pfizer
Rod MacKenzie, PhD, is Chief Development Officer and Executive Vice President for Pfizer. Rod leads the Global Product Development organization, which is responsible for the clinical development and advancement of Pfizer's pipeline of innovative medicines in inflammation and immunology, internal medicine, hospital, oncology and rare disease, as well as regulatory affairs in support of Pfizer's R&D pipeline and portfolio of marketed therapies. He serves on the Portfolio Strategy and Investment Committee, which focuses on maximizing the return on R&D investment across the Pfizer portfolio, and is a member of Pfizer's Executive Leadership Team.
About Washington Post Live
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