Cybersecurity Summit
A summer of crippling ransomware attacks in over 40 U.S. cities. Concerns about the security of the upcoming 2020 election. Spyware, viruses, and disinformation campaigns are just a few of the threats posed by malicious state actors, rogue hackers and others. Are efforts to protect critical data and improve the country’s cyber capabilities proceeding at a fast enough clip?
On Wednesday, Oct. 2, The Washington Post gathered technologists, government officials, security experts, and other leaders in cybersecurity across both public and private sectors to discuss these rapidly evolving issues.
Defending Democracy: Protecting 2020
With the rise of misinformation and fears about the vulnerability of our election systems, national security heavyweights talk about steps they are taking to shore up U.S. election security ahead of the 2020 presidential race.
Highlights
Former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper said the whistleblower complaint that sparked an impeachment inquiry against President Trump is one of the most credible, compelling complaints he’s seen. Former Secretary of Homeland Security Michael Chertoff added that ‘it’s a matter of significant concern,” but cautioned against drawing premature conclusions.
  • Oct 2
President Trump has publicly criticized the whistleblower whose anonymous complaint about the commander in chief helped spark an impeachment inquiry, calling the unidentified official a spy and treasonous. Former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper and former Secretary of Homeland Security Michael Chertoff says that rhetoric can have a harmful effect on the intelligence community. ‘People look to the U.S. as a beacon for the values of democracy and freedom, and the rule of law,’ Chertoff said.
  • Oct 2
Full Segment
With the rise of misinformation and fears about the vulnerability of our election systems, national security heavyweights talk about steps they are taking to shore up U.S. election security ahead of the 2020 presidential race.
  • Oct 3
Michael Chertoff
Former Secretary of Homeland Security
Michael Chertoff is the Executive Chairman and Co-Founder of The Chertoff Group, a global advisory services firm that applies security expertise, technology insights and policy intelligence to help clients build resilient organizations, gain competitive advantage and accelerate growth. In this role, he counsels global clients on how to effectively manage cyber risk while incorporating a proper mix of people, process, and technology to achieve their security goals. He serves on the board of directors of several security companies and is a frequent speaker on security and risk management issues. From 2005 to 2009, Mr. Chertoff served as Secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Earlier in his career, Mr. Chertoff served as a federal judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit and head of the U.S. Department of Justice’s Criminal Division.
James Clapper
Former Director of National Intelligence
The Honorable James R. Clapper served as the fourth US Director of Intelligence from August 9, 2010 to January 20, 2017. In this position, Mr. Clapper led the United States Intelligence Community and served as the principal intelligence advisor to President Barak Obama. Prior to becoming the Director of National Intelligence, Mr. Clapper served for over the three years in two Administrations as the Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence, where he served as the principal staff assistant and advisor to the Secretary and Deputy Secretary on intelligence, counterintelligence, and security matters for the Department. In this capacity, he was also dual-hatted as the Director of Defense Intelligence for the DNI.
Interviewed by David Ignatius
Foreign affairs columnist, The Washington Post
America Held Hostage: How to fight Ransomware
The U.S. is hit by over 4,000 ransomware attacks a day. In August, a coordinated attack crippled 22 Texas towns; over the past year, governments in Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Louisiana and Maryland have suffered similar fates. A top DHS official discusses how federal agencies work with state and local governments to reinforce digital infrastructure and keep our data safe.
Full Segment
The U.S. is hit by over 4,000 ransomware attacks a day. In August, a coordinated attack crippled 22 Texas towns; over the past year, governments in Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Louisiana and Maryland have suffered similar fates. A top DHS official discusses how federal agencies work with state and local governments to reinforce digital infrastructure and keep our data safe.
  • Oct 3
Jeanette Manfra
Assistant Director for Cybersecurity, Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA)
Jeanette Manfra serves as the Assistant Director for Cybersecurity for the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA). Ms. Manfra leads the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) mission of protecting and strengthening the nation’s critical infrastructure from cyber threats. At DHS, she held multiple positions in the Cybersecurity Division, including advisor for the Assistant Secretary for Cybersecurity and Communications and Deputy Director, Office of Emergency Communications, during which time she led the Department’s efforts in establishing the Nationwide Public Safety Broadband Network. Before joining DHS, Jeanette served in the U.S. Army as a communications specialist and a Military Intelligence Officer.
Interviewed by Joseph Marks
Reporter for The Cybersecurity 202 newsletter, The Washington Post
Hacker Trackers: This is Personal
Google’s head of counterespionage, Shane Huntley, joins fellow security experts to discuss cybersecurity threats that impact individual users and new methods for fending off adversaries. Speakers will overview a broad range of cybersecurity trends and the custom tools that can track bad actors and thwart attacks.
Highlight
October is Cybersecurity Awareness Month, but it also marks the start of Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Electronic Frontier Foundation Director of Cybersecurity Eva Galperin, who works with abuse victims, says these victims can also be the targets of stealth software that can be used to track their every move. ‘Most people who are being spied on in their lives are not being spied on by governments or law enforcement. They are being spied on by stalkers or by exes or by people with whom they are currently in an abusive relationship.’
  • Oct 2
Full Segment
Google’s head of counterespionage, Shane Huntley, joins fellow security experts to discuss cybersecurity threats that impact individual users and new methods for fending off adversaries. Speakers will overview a broad range of cybersecurity trends and the custom tools that can track bad actors and thwart attacks.
  • Oct 3
Shane Huntley
Director for Google's Threat Analysis Group
Shane Huntley is the director of Google's Threat Analysis Group. Since joining Google in 2010 he and his team detect, analyze, and disrupt serious and government backed threats against Google and Google users. Shane's core interests lie in combining his team's skills with Google’s technology and resources, delivering tools that aid in the analysis of targeted malware and phishing attacks. This work is also fundamental to separating reality from hype about the world of government backed attacks, and in devising strategies for what we can do about the real threats. Prior to joining Google, Shane was a technical director in the Australian intelligence community, subsequent to his tenure an officer in the Royal Australian Navy.
Eva Galperin
Director of Cybersecurity, Electronic Frontier Foundation
Eva Galperin is EFF's Director of Cybersecurity and head of their Threat Lab. Prior to 2007, when she came to work for EFF, Eva worked in security and IT in Silicon Valley and earned degrees in Political Science and International Relations from SFSU. Her work is primarily focused on providing privacy and security for vulnerable populations around the world. To that end, she has applied the combination of her political science and technical background to everything from organizing EFF's Tor Relay Challenge, to writing privacy and security training materials (including Surveillance Self Defense and the Digital First Aid Kit), and publishing research on malware in Syria, Vietnam, and Kazakhstan. When she is not collecting new and exotic malware, she practices aerial circus arts and learning new languages.
John Scott-Railton
Senior Researcher, The Citizen Lab
John Scott-Railton researches malware, phishing and disinformation as a Senior Researcher at The Citizen Lab. Previously, Scott-Railton did work supporting the free and secure flow of information during conflicts. The Voices Projects, which helped bypass internet shutdowns in Egypt and Libya, are an example. Scott-Railton is a past fellow at Google Ideas / Jigsaw at Alphabet. He is currently working on a PhD at UCLA’s Luskin School of Public Affairs.
Interviewed by Joseph Marks
Reporter for The Cybersecurity 202 newsletter, The Washington Post
The Problem with Encryption: “Going Dark”
Encryption keeps data protected, but it can also impede law enforcement from doing its job. Criminals have learned to use encrypted messaging and privacy protections to cover their tracks. This scenario is often called “going dark.” Hear from a top official at the U.S. Department of Justice about the future of encryption, privacy and safety in the digital age.
Highlight
Last year, more than 18 million cyber tips reporting evidence of child sex abuse were sent to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children; the vast majority of those tips came from Facebook. Sujit Raman, the associate deputy attorney general for the U.S. Department of Justice, says 75% of those tips will ‘go dark’ if social media companies like Facebook follow through with plans to initiate end-to-end encryption.
  • Oct 2
Full Segment
Encryption keeps data protected, but it can also impede law enforcement from doing its job. Criminals have learned to use encrypted messaging and privacy protections to cover their tracks. This scenario is often called “going dark.” Hear from a top official at the U.S. Department of Justice about the future of encryption, privacy and safety in the digital age.
  • Oct 3
Sujit Raman
Associate Deputy Attorney General, U.S. Department of Justice
Sujit Raman serves as Associate Deputy Attorney General in the U.S. Department of Justice. In this role, he assists the Attorney General and Deputy Attorney General in their oversight of the nation's cyber-related criminal and national security investigations and prosecutions, and chairs the Attorney General’s Cyber-Digital Task Force. Mr. Raman is also responsible for the Department’s overall cyber policy development and represents the Department on cyber matters before the National Security Council at the White House. Before joining the Justice Department’s senior leadership staff, Mr. Raman served for over eight years as a federal prosecutor. In this role, he gained extensive courtroom experience, led a number of international fraud, public corruption, and national security matters, and developed particular expertise relating to issues concerning technology and the law.
Interviewed by Ellen Nakashima
National security reporter, The Washington Post
Threats on the Horizon: Securing our Digital Future Today
Over the past century, the U.S. has led the world in technological innovation and development -- but that may be changing. Rivals like China are investing strategically in emerging technologies like A.I., robotics and 5G, and the U.S. is at risk of falling behind. Cyberespionage and intellectual property theft also threaten to undermine American dominance in the digital space. The head of U.S. counterintelligence and the first attorney to successfully indict members of the Chinese Liberation Army for economic espionage discuss global marketplace competition and security.
Highlights
National Counterintelligence and Security Center’s William Evanina says under Xi Jinping, China has become the most amazing surveillance state we have seen in decades, citing their use of facial-recognition technology to monitor ‘every second of everybody’s life.’
  • Oct 2
The U.S. government has been pressing allies in Europe to ban Huawei from their 5G networks because it could increase risk of Chinese spying and cyber attacks, but National Counterintelligence and Security Center’s William Evanina says Huawei is not the problem. ‘If Huawei goes away, there’s another company that’s going to facilitate that role of the Communist Party of China and Xi Jinping’s effort to be the global supplier of telecommunications, and I think that’s the threat we face.’
  • Oct 2
Full Segment
Over the past century, the U.S. has led the world in technological innovation and development -- but that may be changing. Rivals like China are investing strategically in emerging technologies like A.I., robotics and 5G, and the U.S. is at risk of falling behind. Cyberespionage and intellectual property theft also threaten to undermine American dominance in the digital space. The head of U.S. counterintelligence and the first attorney to successfully indict members of the Chinese Liberation Army for economic espionage discuss global marketplace competition and security.
Bill Evanina
Director, National Counterintelligence and Security Center (NCSC)
Bill Evanina serves as the head of Counterintelligence (CI) for the U.S. Government and as the principal CI and security advisor to the Director of National Intelligence. As the Director of the National Counterintelligence and Security Center (NCSC), Mr. Evanina is responsible for leading and supporting the CI and security activities of the U.S. Intelligence Community, the U.S. Government, and U.S. private sector entities at risk from intelligence collection or attack by foreign adversaries. He oversees national-level programs and activities such as the National Insider Threat Task Force; personnel security and background investigations; continuous evaluation; information technology protection standards and compliance; CI cyber operations; supply chain risk management; threat awareness to sectors of the U.S. critical infrastructure; national-level damage assessments from espionage or unauthorized disclosures, CI mission management, and national CI and security training programs.
David J. Hickton
Director and Founder, University of Pittsburgh Institute for Cyber Law, Policy and Security
Prior to his position as founding director of the University of Pittsburgh Institute for Cyber Law, Policy, and Security, David J. Hickton served as United States Attorney for the Western District of Pennsylvania. He was nominated by former President Barack Obama on May 20, 2010, and was confirmed by the U.S. Senate on Aug. 5, 2010. He was sworn in as the District's 57th U.S. Attorney on Aug.12, 2010. Prior to becoming U.S. Attorney, Hickton engaged in the private practice of law, specifically in the areas of transportation, litigation, commercial and white-collar crime.
Interviewed by Ellen Nakashima
National security reporter, The Washington Post
Opening Remarks from Raytheon
Opening Remarks from Raytheon
Jon Check, Senior Director of Cyber Protection Solutions at Raytheon Intelligence, Information and Services, gives opening remarks at The Washington Post Live's Cybersecurity Summit.
  • Oct 3
About Washington Post Live
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