(Kristoffer Tripplaar for The Washington Post)
(Kristoffer Tripplaar for The Washington Post)
(Kristoffer Tripplaar for The Washington Post)
(Kristoffer Tripplaar for The Washington Post)
(Kristoffer Tripplaar for The Washington Post)
(Kristoffer Tripplaar for The Washington Post)
Worldview: North Korea
On June 12, Washington Post Beijing Bureau Chief Anna Fifield spoke with Washington Post columnist David Ignatius about her forthcoming book The Great Successor: The Divinely Perfect Destiny of Brilliant Comrade Kim Jong Un, a behind-the-scenes look at the elusive Kim family dynasty in North Korea. Fifield shared how she gained exclusive access to sources near Kim Jong Un, revealing a rare portrait of the young ruler, his violent rise to power and despotic, unconventional reign. Her reporting reveals how Kim Jung Un has defied expectations and not only managed to survive, but thrive, counting U.S. President Donald Trump as an unlikely ally, despite the state’s authoritarian grip on its citizens.
Anna Fifield has reported from more than 20 countries and has visited North Korea a dozen times, becoming one of the most definitive voices on the highly secretive, oppressive regime. She was joined by North Korea experts for an in-depth look at the country’s storied past and uncertain future.
Behind The Great Successor
Washington Post Beijing Bureau Chief Anna Fifield speaks with Washington Post columnist David Ignatius about her forthcoming book "The Great Successor: The Divinely Perfect Destiny of Brilliant Comrade Kim Jong Un," a behind-the-scenes look at the elusive Kim family dynasty in North Korea.
Highlights
Washington Post Beijing Bureau Chief Anna Fifield’s new book ‘The Great Successor’ reveals that Kim Jong Nam, the slain half brother of Kim Jong Un, was an informant for the CIA. Fifield details the relationship between the two brothers, Kim Jong Nam’s assassination and responds to President Trump’s assertion that he wouldn’t approve of U.S. intelligence agencies using family members of the North Korean leader as assets.
  • Jun 12
Kim Jong Un came into power when he was just 27 years old. Washington Post Beijing Bureau Chief Anna Fifield, whose new book ‘The Great Successor’ details his violent rise to power, describes his tactics as ‘calculated’ and ‘shrewd.’
  • Jun 12
Anna Fifield, the author of ‘The Great Successor: The Divinely Perfect Destiny of Brilliant Comrade Kim Jong Un,’ says North Koreans Anna Fifield, the author of The Great Successor: The Divinely Perfect Destiny of Brilliant Comrade Kim Jong Un, says North Koreans have learned a lot about President Trump by reading his books and studying his tweets. She says little is known “the other way around,” in other words, the U.S. has less insight into North Korean leadership.
  • Jun 12
Full Segment
Washington Post Beijing Bureau Chief Anna Fifield speaks with Washington Post columnist David Ignatius about her forthcoming book "The Great Successor: The Divinely Perfect Destiny of Brilliant Comrade Kim Jong Un," a behind-the-scenes look at the elusive Kim family dynasty in North Korea.
  • Jun 12
Anna Fifield
Beijing Bureau Chief, The Washington Post
Anna Fifield is the Beijing bureau chief for The Washington Post, covering all aspects of greater China. She was the Post's bureau chief in Tokyo between 2014 and 2018, focusing on Japan and the Koreas but periodically reporting from other parts of the region. She particularly concentrated on North Korea, trying to shed light on the lives of ordinary people there and also on how the regime managed to stay in power. Her book, "The Great Successor: The Divinely Perfect Destiny of Brilliant Comrade Kim Jong Un," will be published in June 2019. She started as a journalist in her home country of New Zealand, then worked for the Financial Times for 13 years. During her time there, she reported from almost 20 countries, from Iran and Libya to North Korea and Australia. During the 2013-2014 academic year, she was a Nieman journalism fellow at Harvard, studying how change happens in closed societies.
Interviewed by David Ignatius
Foreign Affairs Columnist, The Washington Post
The State of North Korea
An in-depth look at the current state of affairs in the U.S.-North Korea relationship and analysis of the recent diplomatic breakdown.
Highlights
In May, North Korea launched two short-range missiles. CSIS Senior Adviser and Korea Chair Dr. Victor Cha says the country engages in provocative actions ‘every time negotiations with the United States break down.’ “There is a pattern here. What they haven’t done is another long-range test or nuclear demonstration, which may be a sign of self-restraint on their part.”
  • Jun 12
Dr. Victor Cha, Senior Adviser and Korea Chair for CSIS, says tensions between the United States and North Korea have eased, but there are substantive increases in North Korea’s abilities in recent years. “The temperature has gone down, but at the same time the problem has festered.’
  • Jun 12
Full Segment
An in-depth look at the current state of affairs in the U.S.-North Korea relationship and analysis of the recent diplomatic breakdown.
  • Jun 12
Victor Cha
Senior Adviser and Korea Chair, CSIS
Victor Cha joined the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C., in May 2009 as a senior adviser and the inaugural holder of the Korea Chair. He also holds the D.S. Song-KF Professorship in Government and International Affairs at Georgetown University. He left the White House in 2007 after serving since 2004 as Director for Asian Affairs at the National Security Council (NSC). At the White House, he was responsible primarily for Japan, the Korean peninsula, Australia/New Zealand and Pacific Island nation affairs. Dr. Cha was also the deputy head of delegation for the United States at the Six-Party Talks in Beijing and received two Outstanding Service commendations during his tenure at the NSC. He is also writing a new book on Korean unification.
Carol Morello
Diplomatic Correspondent, The Washington Post
David Nakamura
White House Reporter, The Washington Post
Moderated by Michael Duffy
Deputy Editorial Page Editor, The Washington Post
Full Program
On June 12, Washington Post Beijing Bureau Chief Anna Fifield spoke with Washington Post columnist David Ignatius about her new book ‘The Great Successor: The Divinely Perfect Destiny of Brilliant Comrade Kim Jong Un.’ She was joined by North Korea experts for an in-depth look at the country’s storied past and uncertain future.
  • Jun 24
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