August 27, 2012 - 8:00am - 10:00am | University of Tampa Vaughn Center Crescent Club

Energy & the Election: RNC

How will the outcome of the 2012 election affect energy policy and the future of domestic energy security? Washington Post Live convened energy leaders from industry, advocacy, government, and academia at the Republican National Convention for a breakfast discussion forum to discuss what's next for U.S. energy.  An audience of policy stakeholders heard expert analysis and their approach to energy policy, its relationship to the economy, and the path to an energy-secure future.

Video

Book on energy export opportunities for America

Book on energy export opportunities for America

Kevin Book says, “There’s an energy-hungry world out there growing fast, while the United States is suddenly resplendent with resources to sell it.”
Rep. Mike Conaway discusses competitiveness and energy prices

Rep. Mike Conaway discusses competitiveness and energy prices

Rep. Mike Conaway (R-Texas) on high energy prices and competing in the international market.
Harbert says it’s not a choice between energy and environment

Harbert says it’s not a choice between energy and environment

Karen Harbert, President and CEO of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's Institute for 21st Century Energy, says debate shouldn’t be about a choice between energy or the environment, we have to have both.
Panel discussion: How will the election affect energy policy?

Panel discussion: How will the election affect energy policy?

Rep Mike Conaway, Kevin Book, Kim Holmes, and Bill Maloney on a Washington Post Live panel discussion at the RNC.
Energy and the Election panel

Energy and the Election panel

Washington Post Live hosted a forum on Energy & the Election, this panel discussion featured Melissa Lavinson, David Holt, and Karen Harbert.
Introductory Remarks

Introductory Remarks

Emily Akhtarzandi and Jack Gerrard, President and CEO of API, delivered introductory remarks at Washington Post Live’s energy and the election breakfast at the RNC.

Excerpts from the forum

Karen Harbert

“Energy is now our comparative competitive advantage. We have a lot of oil. We have a lot of natural gas. We have a lot of coal.”

Rep. Mike Conaway

“The [Obama] administration says one thing, but then they do an awful lot of other things that are just the opposite.”

Bill Maloney

“Coal is so important to our economy in West Virginia. We’ve got over 20,000 direct mining jobs. In the last three months, it’s like it’s gone off the edge of the cliff.”

Kim Holmes

“The United States has the potential of being the Saudi Arabia of natural gas. We could become an exporter. This could have a tremendous effect in the future on our economy if we do the right thing.”

Kevin Book

“There’s an energy-hungry world out there growing fast, while the United States is suddenly resplendent with resources to sell it.”

David Holt

“We are in an energy revolution in this country.”

Melissa Lavinson

“Welders, pipefitters, software engineers, nuclear engineers . . . we need a new generation of workforce to come in, take jobs of folks who are leaving.”

Speakers

Anthony Earley

Anthony Earley

Chairman, CEO, and President, Pacific Gas & Electric Corporation

David Holt

David Holt

President, Consumer Energy Alliance

Kim Holmes

Kim Holmes

Vice President for Foreign and Defense Policy Studies and Director, Davis Institute for International Studies, The Heritage Foundation

Kevin Book

Kevin Book

Managing Director, Clearview Energy Partners

Kateri Callahan

Kateri Callahan

President, Alliance to Save Energy

Karen Harbert

Karen Harbert

President and CEO, U.S. Chamber of Commerce's Institute for 21st Century Energy

Paul Bledsoe

Paul Bledsoe

Senior Advisor, Bipartisan Policy Center

Mary Jordan

Mary Jordan

Editor, Washington Post Live

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