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Chico Harlan named The Post’s first global climate correspondent

WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 18: Chico Harlan, reporter for the Washington Post, on July, 18, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post)

Announcement from Climate and Environment Editor Zachary Goldfarb, Climate and Environment Deputy Editor Juliet Eilperin and Climate & Environment’s Policy, Politics and Power Editor Stuart Leavenworth:

We are so pleased to announce that Chico Harlan, one of our distinguished foreign correspondents, is joining the Climate team as our first global climate correspondent.

In this new role, Chico will traverse Europe, Africa and the Middle East to uncover the most important stories about how global warming and environmental change are affecting people and societies. He will seek out compelling human narratives, pursue critical questions of accountability and capture how people across the globe are adapting to a shifting landscape.

Chico has had a highly varied career at The Post, having served in four departments. He has shown extraordinary versatility in covering news in difficult circumstances, writing memorable long-form narratives and spearheading important investigations.

Chico got his start at The Post in 2008 in the Sports department, covering the Washington Nationals. He then moved to the Foreign desk, becoming the paper’s East Asia bureau chief. He was in Japan during the country’s 9.0-magnitude earthquake and nuclear meltdowns, a disaster that defined his four-year tenure. In the middle of so much suffering, there was a baseball story, too: about a high school team from a tsunami-obliterated town that had survived because the practice field was atop a hill.

He then returned to Washington, covering economic issues for the Business desk and working on a four-part project on the financial struggles of the Deep South. He then spent a year on The Post’s national enterprise team.

Since 2018, he has served as Rome bureau chief. He has chronicled the dire early coronavirus wave in Italy, with memorable stories that gave Americans a sense of what was coming. Over the past year, he has written regularly about the ramifications of the war in Ukraine. Anybody who follows him on social media knows about his affection for Italian hill towns. His major investigations into abuse cases have pointed to failures at the very top of the Catholic Church and stand as some of the essential works of journalism about the Pope Francis era.

Chico lives with his wife, Lilian, and 3-year-old son, Leonardo. The couple is expecting a daughter in early April.

Please congratulate Chico on this new assignment, which he will start later this year after wrapping up some work for Foreign.

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