The Washington Post

Anthony Bourdain's Boeuf Bourguignon

Anthony Bourdain's Boeuf Bourguignon 6.000

Justin Tsucalas for The Washington Post; food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post

Dec 22, 2004

Anthony Bourdain's take on the classic dish of beef braised in red wine requires time, but no complicated ingredients or techniques. The reward: a satisfying, hearty stew in which the tender meat and rich, silken sauce are the stars.

As Bourdain writes in his "Les Halles Cookbook": "This dish is much better the second day. Just cool the stew down in an ice bath, or on your countertop (the Health Department is unlikely to raid your kitchen). Refrigerate overnight. When time, heat and serve. Goes well with a few boiled potatoes. But goes really well with a bottle of Cote de Nuit Villages Pommard."

Make Ahead: For best flavor, this dish should be made 1 day in advance. The stew will keep up to 3 days in the refrigerator and 2 to 3 months in the freezer. Thaw in the refrigerator or microwave and finish heating on the stove top.

Where to Buy: Demi-glace is a concentrated sauce typically made with a meat stock and sometimes wine; it is available in the soup aisle of large grocery stores.


Servings:
6 - 8

When you scale a recipe, keep in mind that cooking times and temperatures, pan sizes and seasonings may be affected, so adjust accordingly. Also, amounts listed in the directions will not reflect the changes made to ingredient amounts.

Tested size: 6-8 servings

Ingredients
  • 2 pounds boneless beef shoulder or neck (chuck), cut into 1 1/2-inch pieces
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup olive oil, divided
  • 4 medium onions, halved and thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup red burgundy wine (such as pinot noir)
  • 6 medium carrots, peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 bouquet garni (a tied bundle of herbs, typically thyme, bay and parsley)
  • Water
  • Demi-glace (optional; see headnote)
  • Chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley, for garnish

Directions

Thoroughly pat the meat dry with paper towels and generously season it with salt and pepper.

In a Dutch oven over high heat, heat half of the oil until shimmering. Working in several batches, and without moving the meat much, sear the meat on all sides until well browned, adding more oil as needed. (If you try to cook too much meat at once, it will steam and turn gray instead of brown.) Once the meat is well browned, transfer to a plate.

Reduce the heat to medium-high and add the onions and any remaining oil to the pot. Cook, stirring from time to time, until the onions have softened and turn golden, about 10 minutes. Sprinkle the flour on top and cook, stirring occasionally, until thickened, 4 to 5 minutes. Add the wine and, using a wooden spoon, stir, scraping up all the browned bits (fond) off the bottom of the pot.

Once the wine starts to boil, return the meat and its accumulated juices to the pot, and add the carrots, garlic and the bouquet garni. Add 1 1/2 cups of water (and about 2 tablespoons of demi-glace, if you have it). Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to medium-low and cook, uncovered, until the meat is tender, 2 to 2 1/2 hours, skimming off any foam or oil that might accumulate on the surface. Check on the stew every 15 to 20 minutes, stirring and scraping the bottom of the pot to prevent scorching or sticking. As you check on the stew, continue adding 1/4 cup to 1/2 cup water, as needed, up to 2 1/2 to 3 cups total — to ensure there is enough liquid to cook down and concentrate. If the stew begins to stick, reduce the heat to low. The onions should fall apart, creating a thick, rich sauce that coats the meat.

When the stew is done, discard the bouquet garni, taste the stew and season with more salt, if desired. Garnish with the chopped parsley and serve.

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Recipe Source

Adapted from "Anthony Bourdain's Les Halles Cookbook: Strategies, Recipes, and Techniques of Classic Bistro Cooking," by Anthony Bourdain with Jose de Meirelles and Phillipe Lajaunie (Bloomsbury USA, 2004).

Tested by Becky Krystal and Ann Maloney.

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Nutritional Facts

Calories per serving (based on 8): 414


% Daily Values*

Total Fat: 29g 45%

Saturated Fat: 10g 50%

Cholesterol: 81mg 27%

Sodium: 129mg 5%

Total Carbohydrates: 12g 4%

Dietary Fiber: 2g 8%

Sugar: 5g

Protein: 21g


*Percent Daily Value based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Total Fat: Less than 65g

Saturated Fat: Less than 20g

Cholesterol: Less than 300mg

Sodium: Less than 2,400mg

Total Carbohydrates: 300g

Dietary Fiber: 25g

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